6 Stereoscopic Cameras for Analogue 3D Photography

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In the mid-1940s came a new photography trend among hobbyists — stereo photography. It is a way of using two photographs to create a three-dimensional image. It became very popular among amateurs and lasted even when stereoscopic camera manufacturers stopped producing them in the 1960s.

Here are some of the known stereoscopic cameras produced during the stereo photography era.

Nimslo 3D

If you’re new to stereo photography, this one’s for you. The Nimslo 3D is a 35 mm stereo camera which allows 3D photographs to be viewed without glasses owing to its Lenticular printing. This camera has a fixed focus and automatic exposure for easy use. Unfortunately, this camera is no longer in production and there are very few laboratories that offer Lenticular printing services now.

Image by John Alan Elson from Wikimedia Commons

Learn more about this stereo camera in this article.

Stereo Realist

The 1945 Stereo Realist is the most revered stereo camera, even among celebrities. It uses a 135 film with unusual slide proportions and has rangefinder focusing. This camera introduced the Realist format and started the era of stereo photography and was the one of its kind still in production in the 1960s.

45FR model of the Stereo Realist camera by John Alan Elson from Wikimedia Commons

Learn more about this stereo camera in this article.

Kodak Stereo Camera

The 1954 Kodak Stereo Camera was the second best-selling stereo camera at the time of its release. It uses 35 mm slide film to reproduce the image quality that the Stereo Realist has. The camera is known for its beginner-friendly configuration and offers a range of apertures and shutter speeds. Kodak stopped producing the stereo camera in 1959.

Image by John Alan Elson from Wikimedia Commons

Learn more about this stereo camera in this website.

View-Master Personal Stereo

The View-Master Personal Stereo is a 35 mm slide stereo camera with fixed focusing and changeable aperture and shutter speed settings. It has 8 advanced sprockets, the same as Realist format cameras. The film can be developed in any laboratory. Just make sure they won’t cut and mount the film.

Image by John Alan Elson from Wikimedia Commons

Learn more about this stereo camera through this website.

Verascope f40

The Verascope f40, released in 1938, is known to be one of the best stereo cameras ever made (right next to the Stereo Realist) thanks to its rangefinder focusing. It uses 35 mm film with 7 perforations (24 × 30 mm) areas.

Image by Mme de Sévigné from Wikimedia Commons

Learn more about this stereo camera through this website.

Holga 120 3D

The Holga 120 3D is Lomography’s own medium-format stereo camera which captures the two images at the same time. To view the images, a slide viewer is required. Though it is one of the most recent stereoscopic cameras to be made, the Holga 120 3D has ceased production. You can still browse through the gallery for Holga 120 3D photographs produced by the Community members.

Visit the Lomography Shop for more information about this stereo camera.


Do you know any other stereo camera not included in this list? Use the comment box below!

2016-04-29 #gear #lifestyle #film-photography #film-cameras #stereo-photography #3d-photography #holga-120-3d #stereoscopic-cameras #3d-cameras

2 Comments

  1. vicuna
    vicuna ·

    You forgot the GOMZ/LOMO Sputnik!! camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Sputnik

  2. vicuna
    vicuna ·

    And there's a long list of stereo cameras on this site... www.stereoscopy.com/cameras/index.html

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