Tipster of the Week: Custom Film Roll Labels for X-PRO

18

Do you go to your local photo lab and ask politely for x-pro? Do you convince the supermarket staff to process the film using the wrong chemicals? Do you scratch the film canister so heavily that no one could possibly read "E-6"? My favorite way to get cross processed photos is sticking a self-made label onto the film roll.

Two film rolls with affixed labels.

How do you X-PRO?
Do you go to your local photo lab and ask politely for x-pro? Do you convince the supermarket staff to process the film using the wrong chemicals? Do you scratch the film canister so heavily that no one could possibly read “E-6”? My favorite way to get cross processed photos is sticking a self-made label onto the film roll.

Idea of creating custom labels
There are some photo labs that offer cross process but for a very unreasonable price or only after long minutes of begging. Since a super market usually offers good prints for an unbeatable price, I wanted them to process my films. First, I tried to convince the staff to cross process my slide film, but they just told me, it would spoil the chemicals and would never work at all.
Writing “C-41” in the notes filed of a film roll didn’t work either.

It would have been too easy…

Then, I thought about winding the film into a negative spool and then… Well, why should I wind the film into another spool, when I can simply exchange the spool’s label?
I started InDesign and created my own labels. (I have to admit that the design is not brilliant.) Until now, there were no complaints and every super market and every lab accepted the film (some regarded the spool curiously but it was fine).

Not winning a design prize but reliable.

HIGH SATURATION” is a label made for films like Kodak’s Elite Chrome 100 that doesn’t shift colors that much.
JUST RED” was created for films like Fuji’s Sensia 100
MOODY BLUE” is for films that you expect to turn out blue, like Fuji’s Sensia 200 (Don’t worry about the label’s ISO.)

Affixing the labels
The trickiest part by far is the correct printing and affixing of the labels. That’s why you will have to be creative at this point and I can only describe you my way of doing this. I use white address labels by avery and then I have to hope that the printer works correctly. The shorter side of the film roll label should be 36mm (and the longer about 75mm). After cutting off the white stripes, you can take a black permanent marker and color the film roll’s edges. Since I am a bit superstitious, I always color the entire roll. Then you can carefully stick the label onto the roll.

Step by step to a new label.

If you want to download my labels in a higher resolution, here you go:
HIGH SATURATION, 24 Exp.
HIGH SATURATION, 36 Exp.
JUST RED, 24 Exp.
JUST RED, 36 Exp.
MOODY BLUE, 24 Exp.
MOODY BLUE, 36 Exp.

Print out as many as you like, give them away, do whatever you want with them!

written by floriansimon on 2010-06-27 in #gear #tipster

18 Comments

  1. vicuna
    vicuna ·

    Nice idea! :)) And thanks for the downloadable labels :)

  2. draki
    draki ·

    Nice trick! ;) Although I don't have any problems with xpro where I live and the price is almost the same as processing a negative, I have a big problem with scanning. Scanners are too expensive for me at the moment and I can't scan anywhere my 35mm film with exposed holes :(

  3. reneg88
    reneg88 ·

    brilliant! =)

  4. wuxiong
    wuxiong ·

    I am lucky I don't have this problem in my lab......

  5. myloveletter
    myloveletter ·

    Genius! Some people are lucky to not have this problem, but it is a HUGE problem to me! I always write over the E6 or whatever part with a sharpie, blame it on "my daughter who tries to keep her film seperate from her class mates" (silly kids!) nut this is just genius.

  6. squidologist
    squidologist ·

    Great idea!

  7. danieldk
    danieldk ·

    Wow, No more negotiating with staff that don't understand what I am saying !!
    Brilliant, Now my only problem is scanning my pretties..., film scanners lots expensive for a student :)

  8. sthomas68
    sthomas68 ·

    That's a pretty clever idea. …:)

  9. takeaphotoitlllastlonger
    takeaphotoitlllastlonger ·

    I have a question. I tried this before. I didn't tell the photolab that my film was E6 and they processed it as is - using C-41. But when it came back to me, the whole spool was blank. Was there something wrong on my part or was it their fault? Did I miss something?

  10. takeaphotoitlllastlonger
    takeaphotoitlllastlonger ·

    I have a question. I tried this before. I didn't tell the photolab that my film was E6 and they processed it as is - using C-41. But when it came back to me, the whole spool was blank. Was there something wrong on my part or was it their fault? Did I miss something?

  11. vojta
    vojta ·

    This sounds very goody and may save money, as well. I will try it.

  12. minty
    minty ·

    I did a tipster for this a while ago...

    www.lomography.com/magazine/tipster/2009/12/26/how-to-get-y…

  13. keith_brennan
    keith_brennan ·

    This is a great idea! But it would also be really cool if you could make one for E-6 processing. :)

  14. aviel08
    aviel08 ·

    GENIUS!!!

  15. trw
    trw ·

    Brilliant!

  16. freyaramoana
    freyaramoana ·

    THANK YOU VERY MUCH xD

  17. jord
    jord ·

    Thanks for the labels!

  18. minyuk
    minyuk ·

    Very nice, thanks a lot!

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