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Shooting Film Poems with LomoKino LomoAmigo Pmueller

We’re bringing back the LomoKino LomoAmigo series starting this month, and for this week, the spotlight’s on this lomographer, painter, and filmmaker from Germany!

It was in the beautiful city of Paris where he discovered his love for the cinema and the arts. He enjoys and is inspired by the works of influential filmmakers F.W. Murnau, Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, and Jean-Luc Godard, and it was after seeing Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s LomoKino movie ASHES that he was finally motivated to shoot his own. Meet pmueller, our LomoKino LomoAmigo for the week!

Photo by pmueller

Name: Patrick Müller
Lomography username: pmueller
Location: Germany
Number of years as a Lomographer: One analogue year
Number of years in the community: The same

Tell us about yourself. What do you do for a living? What are your interests?

I’m a painter and filmmaker, but I work at my parent’s business to earn a living. After studying Engineering Management, I took up Language Studies in Paris where my love for cinema and art developed. My passion for films by Murnau, Straub-Huillet, and Godard motivated me to start making my own motion pictures. I made more than 20 short films, most of which are essay films, film poems, and, well, LomoKino films!

In my hometown I’m a member of an association that has revived an old analogue cinema. I have also founded an art and culture association. I like nature, cinema, cats, Flaubert, Terrine de Campagne, red wine, and my vegetable garden.

Describe the LomoKino in five words.

Fun, small, surprising, magical, back to the essence of filmmaking.

How did you like shooting with the LomoKino?

I loved shooting with the LomoKino. The limitation of 144 images per film roll makes things more creative. Although it wasn’t always easy to wind the film forward and the construction itself was a bit shaky, the results are magical. Using a monopod was of great help. Small and portable, it stabilized lots of shots without being too bulky. Setting the correct exposure was easier than I thought, and new films could be easily bought at the photo shop at the beach where I shot “L’eternité (Eternity)”.

When I got home I had 30 rolls of film that needed not only to be developed but also scanned painstakingly frame by frame. In editing the movie, finding the right rhythm was important to keep the images in time with the music.

Filming with LomoKino was one hell of a fun – so strange, so different it was. It has been a great experience for me, the images you get are just fantastic with its dreamy look. It’s like capturing memories forever.

“L’eternité (Eternity)” by pmueller

What or who has inspired you to purchase and use the LomoKino?

It was on the day I saw filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s amazing experimental film called “Ashes,” which he shot with the LomoKino camera. The result inspired and encouraged me to try it myself.

Any funny or strange encounters you’ve had with it?

It’s always fun to shoot with it. People stop by, look curiously, and ask questions like, “What you do with this little, clicking box?” So be prepared – with LomoKino, you are never alone!

“Lomomotion” was pmueller’s very first Kino film

If you could shoot any person alive or dead, real or fictional, with your LomoKino, who would it be and why?

My girlfriend on the day when we first met. Like an analogue-filmed notebook.

Kindly share with us any LomoKino movie that you love the most.

Movie by togotogo

It is difficult because there are so many. But recently I liked “Miyako city, my hometown” by togotogo very, very much. It’s a very honest, dreamy collection of places full of memories.

Any future plans with your LomoKino? More shoots or a full-length film, perhaps?

After my LomoKino experience had introduced me to other film formats like the Super 8, I will definitely shoot with it again this year. It has capabilities no other camera has.

“Saget Steine mir an (Tell me, ye stones),” another film poem by pmueller filmed this time with the Super 8

Your advice to future LomoKino users.

Try shooting with a monopod and plan in advance what you intend to shoot. When filming a poem this is not as easy, but writing annotations alongside the text, like Love, Despair, Hope, etc., helped me. Then you will find the counterparts in nature a lot easier and filmmaking can become much more relaxing.

Any last words?

Always make sure your film is properly loaded and that you have your LomoKino ready on hand, just in case nature decides to surprise you. And if you look closely, you’ll find that there is beauty every minute of the day. Don’t miss those moments; they’ll never come back.

Know more about Patrick Müller at www.patrickcinema.de.

Do you have something to say about your LomoKino experience? Drop me a line at julien.matabuena@lomography.com and you might be our next LomoKino LomoAmigo!

Enter a new analogue dimension with the LomoKino. Lomography’s own 35mm analogue movie camera allows you to capture action and immortalize your story on film! Shoot 144 frames on any 35mm film and create your own cinematic masterpieces. Want to watch your movie the old-school way? We also offer the LomoKino and LomoKinoscope package!

written by chooolss

4 comments

  1. chooolss

    chooolss

    Thank you for this interview @pmueller! :)

    8 months ago · report as spam
  2. pmueller

    pmueller

    @choolss My pleasure!

    8 months ago · report as spam
  3. clausmith

    clausmith

    Really cool!

    8 months ago · report as spam
  4. pmueller

    pmueller

    My Lomokino film ETERNITY will even be presented at Signes de Nuit International Film Festival in Berlin/Paris! http://www.signesden(…)/D_F_DE.htm

    3 months ago · report as spam