Tag: appreciating films series

  • Appreciating Films: The Passion of Joan of Arc – The Haunting Images of Facial Expressions

    written by tattso on 2011-10-18
    Appreciating Films: The Passion of Joan of Arc – The Haunting Images of Facial Expressions

    The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) is a beautiful silent film that collects some of the most haunting images of facial expressions. The actors were not allowed to wear make up unlike the other silent films, also made possible by the newly developed panchromatic film that could capture a natural skin tone, making it a unique work from the silent era that stands the test of time.

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  • Appreciating Films: Rope (Featuring Alfred Hitchcock's Experimental Stunt)

    written by marthasmarvels on 2011-11-17
    Appreciating Films: Rope (Featuring Alfred Hitchcock's Experimental Stunt)

    Alfred Hitchcock’s 1948 film, Rope, is considered by many to be his most experimental and innovative film. It is renowned for its ingenious editing techniques and use of real time which has led numerous people to believe that the film consists of one continuous shot.

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  • Appreciating Films: Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927)

    written by marthasmarvels on 2011-11-24
    Appreciating Films: Fritz Lang's Metropolis (1927)

    Fritz Lang’s 1927 work, Metropolis, was a key example of German expressionist film and is considered as one of the first, if not the first, science fiction film that would eventually inspire and influence directors such as Ridley Scott, Stanley Kubrick and George Lucas. The film portrays an urban dystopia set in the year 2000 where society is divided into two; an opulent ruling class that live in luxurious above ground skyscrapers, whilst the working underclass toil in a subterranean hellish nightmare.

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  • Appreciating Films: Jean Luc Godard's Playful Picture Bande à Part

    written by marthasmarvels on 2011-11-30 #videos
    Appreciating Films: Jean Luc Godard's Playful Picture Bande à Part

    Jean Luc Godard was renowned for his experimental film work as part of the French New Wave (La Nouvelle Vaugue) film movement. Out of all of his films Bande à Part is his most carefree and accessible appealing to a wider audience with its gangster film inspired plot.

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  • Appreciating Films: Ring (1998)

    written by plasticpopsicle on 2011-12-03 #videos
    Appreciating Films: Ring (1998)

    I have always been a fan of Japanese films, especially the terrifying, nightmare-inducing ones. I know Halloween has long been over, but please allow me to introduce a J-Horror film for my contribution to this interesting series.

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  • Appreciating Films: A Streetcar Named 'Desire'

    written by kneehigh85 on 2011-12-08
    Appreciating Films: A Streetcar Named 'Desire'

    A Streetcar Named 'Desire' is one of my favourite books/plays/movies of all time. It made the jump from stage to screen effortlessly and worked just as well in both formats.

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  • Appreciating Films: The Shining (1980) Trailer

    written by tattso on 2011-10-26
    Appreciating Films: The Shining (1980) Trailer

    The trailer of The Shining, that is of course my favorite film of all time, is my favorite trailer of all time. The trailer lasts for 1 minute and 30 seconds, in a still shot of blood pouring out of the elevators' doors while the credit is scrolling up.

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  • Appreciating Films: Vertov's Man With a Movie Camera

    written by marthasmarvels on 2011-12-03
    Appreciating Films: Vertov's Man With a Movie Camera

    Dziga Vertov’s 1929 film The Man with the Movie Camera was truly revolutionary. It not only implemented various new cinematic techniques including varied speeds, stop-motion and split screens to name a few, but it also controversially exposed the apparatus involved in making film itself.

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  • Appreciating Films: West Beyrouth (1998)

    written by webo29 on 2011-12-05
    Appreciating Films: West Beyrouth (1998)

    When I picked up West Beyrouth from our awesome DVD rental place, I thought it was a film about war in Lebanon and that the boy on the cover was holding a gun. Turns out it was a Super 8 camera and not a weapon (the way it should be). Oh, and yes, the film’s worth watching.