More Recent Articles

  • Efke ir820 (120, 25 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Efke ir820 (120, 25 iso)

    This film is the real infrared deal! Marvellous spectral sensitivity up to 820nm. What does that mean? When coupled with an opaque red filter your images will blast with pure white wizardry. Trees, clouds and skin will be awakened in white.

  • Forte Fortepan (120, 400 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Forte Fortepan (120, 400 iso) staff-review

    This little treat is super in artificial light as it boasts extended light sensitivity in the red part of the spectrum. Additionally, the Fortepan 400 has a surprisingly lengthy tonal range even when light is scarce.

  • Kodak Ektachrome VS (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Kodak Ektachrome VS (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    This kind of vivid saturation at 100 ISO seems incredible. But as you can see it is true! If films could be measured in terms of dramatic effect the 100VS would be a diva.

    4
  • Fuji Acros (120, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Acros (120, 100 iso)

    This monochrome champ gives awesome grey tones and razor-sharp results with extremely fine grain. Wonderful for when you want to slow things down a bit. When shooting with the Holga, use in full sun or with a long-exposure (or a flash!)

  • Fuji Sensia (35mm, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Sensia (35mm, 100 iso) staff-review

    This smooth brother is lovely when straight processed and wild when crossed. Cross processed Fuji shots have huge contrast and a total color shift towards green & cream, blue, or even pink - depending on your developer.

    2
  • Ilford HP5 plus (120, 400 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear

    A faster film with more grain and stronger contrast. Whites are super-bright, blacks are super-bold, and it's all good! The 400 ISO rating makes it super for low-light & night shots – and very fast moving objects.

    1
  • Rolleiflex 35F - Staff Review

    written by shhquiet on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Rolleiflex 35F - Staff Review

    One of the finest TLR (twin lens reflex) cameras to grace planet Earth, the Rolleiflex 3.5F is a classic masterpiece of German engineering.

    5
  • Rollei Retro (35mm, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Rollei Retro  (35mm, 100 iso)

    A very special film designed to give the sharp tones and punchy contrast of classic black and white photography.

  • Fuji Neopan (120, 400 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Neopan (120, 400 iso) staff-review

    A really solid black and white medium format film that's perfect for the Holga. Fast ISO 400 speed, fine grain, and gorgeous black and white tones.

  • Olympus XA - Staff Review

    written by shhquiet on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Olympus XA - Staff Review

    A child of the mid-1970s, the Olympus XA is a super-compact rangefinder camera that’s bursting with a lot of techno-wonderful features. A true pocket camera for the discerning photographer. It’s designer, Mr. Yoshihisa Maitani, would not have had it any other way.

    5
  • Agfa CT Precisa (35mm, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Agfa CT Precisa (35mm, 100 iso)

    When cross-processed, this old piano prefers blue notes to anything else, and will do anything to melodically play them into your image.

    2
  • Fuji Velvia (35mm, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Velvia (35mm, 100 iso) staff-review

    Velvia is world-famous as the most saturated slide film that you can buy. Shoot this on a bright day and develop it normally, and the results will knock you head over arse. When crossed, it gives you that wild Fuji green-blue color shift that we absolutely love.

    3
  • Rollei Retro (120, 400 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Rollei Retro (120, 400 iso)

    A very special film designed to give the sharp tones and punchy contrast of classic black and white photography. And believe me, the Rollei people know a thing or two about this!

  • Fuji Reala (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Reala  (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    Bold colors, great skin tones, and super-reliable performance means that Reala is quite possibly the best consumer-grade color negative film in the world. For real!

  • Fuji Pro (120, 160 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Pro (120, 160 iso)

    pro-quality color film that's a little faster than the Reala 100 but has the creamy-smooth fine grain of a film that's much slower (say an ISO 25 or 50). Of course, the colors, contrast, and dynamic range are fantastic.

  • Ilford Deltapro (120, 3200 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Ilford Deltapro (120, 3200 iso)

    This super-high speed film allows for hand-held shooting in low light without a flash. It also features a fat film grain for that authentic old-school "noir" look. Fill 'er up and give Cartier-Bresson a run for his money.

    3
  • Agfa Portrait (120, 160 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Agfa Portrait (120, 160 iso)

    Oh man. When you want a break from explosive saturation, load up a little Portrait 160 for smooth & even tones, slightly subdued highlights, and a serious touch o' class.

  • Agfa Optima II (120, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear

    Using Agfa's mysterious "eye-vision technology" this increasingly rare color-negative film offers outstanding color depth and absolutely wonderful red tones – to the point of imparting a totally unique warm-saturated cast to most daylight images.

  • Olympus Pen FT- Staff Review

    written by shhquiet on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Olympus Pen FT- Staff Review

    An exquisite half-frame SLR camera created by the world famous Olympus designer, Yoshihisa Maitani. With high-quality interchangeable lenses, this tiny and compact camera is a supremely collectible vintage gem.

    6
  • Fuji Pro (120, 400 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Pro (120, 400 iso)

    One of the finest 120 color films out there. You get the extra speed of 400 ISO while maintaining excellent fine-grain and banging colors of a slower film. This ain't a professional emulsion for nothing. Our favorite color film for the Holga. "

    2
  • Agfa Optima (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Agfa Optima (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    A fine-grained smooth operator that yields bold but still quite natural colors – and lovely shadow tones. This is a solid choice for when you want the subject – not the film – to do the talking.

    1
  • Kodak Portra 400vc (120, 400 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Kodak Portra 400vc (120, 400 iso)

    A professional and usually very expensive film. On sunny days, the colors are mind-blowingly vivid - and almost look cross-processed. Its results are totally unique and unlike any other film.

    3
  • Kodak Pro Image (35mm, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Kodak Pro Image (35mm, 100 iso)

    A mysterious and quite rare Kodak color negative - it's known for some of the most pleasing green and blue tones that a consumer film can deliver. The power of ProImage compels you!

    2
  • Fuji Astia (120, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Astia (120, 100 iso)

    For the "natural ones" out there, Fuji Astia delivers muted, smooth colors with low contrast, beautiful skin tones, and razor-point resolution. Quite a nice choice for when you're looking to whisper with your images - rather than scream your freaking head off with saturation. Turns the usual fuji blue-green-red cream when you cross-process!

    1
  • Kodak Elitechrome EB (35mm, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Kodak Elitechrome EB (35mm, 100 iso) staff-review

    A gorgeous slide film that gives straight-up vivid results when normally processed. If you cross-process it, you'll end up with intense saturation and contrast, but only a very subtle color shift. It's like taking everyday life and cranking it up to "11."

    2
  • Fuji Superia (120, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Superia (120, 100 iso)

    A basic and beautiful film with fine grain and vivid, yet natural colors. It's especially good with light skin tones.

    2
  • Rollei Retro (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Rollei Retro (120, 100 iso) staff-review

    A very special film designed to give the sharp tones and punchy contrast of classic black and white photography.

  • Kodak Portra (35mm, 400 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Kodak Portra (35mm, 400 iso)

    A professional and usually very expensive film. When used on sunny days, the colors are mind-glowingly vivid - and almost look cross-processed. Its results are totally unique and unlike any other film.

    2
  • Fuji Provia (120, 100 iso)

    written by fookshit on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fuji Provia (120, 100 iso)

    Somewhere between the buckwild colors of Velvia and the silky understatement of Astia is Fuji Provia. You'll get magical color pops without making all of your pale skintones look insane. Everybody wins! Turns the usual fuji blue-green-red cream when you cross-process it.

  • Fed 2 - Staff Review

    written by shhquiet on 2008-05-23 #gear
    Fed 2 - Staff Review

    The Fed 2 Rangefinder camera (manufactured in six variations) is recognized as one of the most excellent rangefinders that’s easy on the pocket.

    2