Embracing Low ISO: Mørkerommet Collective Showcase 7 Perspectives with the Babylon Kino B&W Film

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Mørkerommet is an analogue photography collective based in Bergen, Norway. We sent them some rolls of our Babylon Kino B&W 35 mm ISO 13 film to try out, resulting in seven unique perspectives captured. The Babylon Kino is known for its super low ISO of 13, requiring a lot of light for shooting and at times presenting a significant challenge. However, this challenge was eagerly accepted by the collective. These are their results and insights!

Credits: Elias Jacobsen

Elias Jacobsen

Elias has been a member of mørkerommet since fall 2022. He was introduced to analogue Photography when he inherited a Canon AE-1 and started to shoot with it during the pandemic. For the Babylon Kino he used a Canon P with a 50 mm 1.8 lens.

Credits: Elias Jacobsen
“The process of shooting this Babylon Kino was very interesting. I really love the contrast from this film. I think it is very cool to be able to shoot wide open during the daytime, however, that also makes it harder to get sharp results with my softer vintage lens (which should really be put down). Overall, I'm very pleased with a lot of the images.”
Credits: Elias Jacobsen

Hans Jørgen Hjemda

Hans has studied Classical Portrait Photography since 2019 and is about to finish his second degree. He's been playing around and practicing with analogue photography and spent last year trying to find his favorite film. Could the Babylon Kino be the one he was looking for? Hans experimented with shooting 35 mm film in a medium format camera, using the Mamiya RB67.

Credits: Hans Jørgen Hjemda
“I found the film fun to shoot and less challenging than expected. Every picture was taken with a tripod and mirror lockup. I got through the first half roll I had spooled up in the Mamiya. When I brought the second half to the city center it quickly jammed, making the second half unusable. My bad, I guess, as it was the first try shooting 35 in a medium format.”
Credits: Hans Jørgen Hjemda

Hans-Christian Horne

Another Hans! This Hans is a Bergen based concert- and hobby-photographer. If he is not busy photographing local and not-so-local bands, he likes to walk through the local graveyard for photo-opportunities. For the Babylon Kino he swapped his usual photography style and decided to capture some well-known Bergen places, some hidden gems and a occasional street cat. He used a soviet Zenit ET camera with a Helios lens.

Credits: Hans-Christian Horne
“Babylon is a very picky film which demands very specific lighting conditions, bright sunny days, fog, snow, and other white conditions. But when you have these conditions the film can be extremely rewarding. Personally I feel this film gives sort of a gothic vibe in some instances, especially in the way where some images look like they were taken in the very early 20th century and the way the white background can contrast nicely with darker foregrounds without losing too much detail.”
Credits: Hans-Christian Horne

Johan Fredrik

When Johan picked up an analogue camera in 2018 he was sold. Using it as his primary camera makes him feel more deliberated. Apart from studying computer science he loves to explore the world. He visited Zanzibar with the Babylon Kino, using a Nikon F3 with 50 mm f2.

Credits: Johan Fredrik
“It was challenging, I have never shot a film with such a low ISO, so I didn’t know what to expect.
The only guideline was the need for a lot of light, which you find in abundance in Zanzibar, but Stone Town also contains a lot of narrow streets with challenging conditions. The pictures should portray this as well, the photos taken in open space have a lot of contrast and are crisp. While the photos with low light struggle a lot, you get this mystic look which has a certain appeal. Overall, I would say Babylon 13 lived up to the expectations.”
Credits: Johan Fredrik

Liz Imbrie

Liz previously attended an alternative school where she mainly worked with analogue photography. For the Babylon Kino she used the Canon EOS 500 and decided to shoot nature around her home, discovering small wonders that you would normally take for granted.

Credits: Liz Imbrie
“I found the film somewhat challenging as it is has an unusual ISO I have not worked with before, but any amateur can master it I would say. The challenging part was exactly what made it fun to be honest, especially the results! I took the pictures on a cloudy day when the sun was at is highest. The thing I really liked about it, is that it captures nature in an almost mystic way. I could see this film being perfect for some photoshoot in the woods as the way this film has the ability to capture everything in detail as the light shines on it, but it still looks almost black. You can basically shoot a “nighttime” scenario in the middle of the day, which I find really cool. I will definitely be using this film in future!”
Credits: Liz Imbrie

Mathias Jonstang Hordvei

Mathias is relatively new to analogue Photography. He bought his first analogue SLR (a Canon AV-1) in January 2023 and has been shooting a lot since. He wanted to test the Babylon Kino film on a variety of subjects, such as people, nature and the streets of Bergen. He aimed to capture the feeling of the dark winter months. He used a Nikon F4.

Credits: Mathias Jonstang Hordvei
“I found the shooting experience to be different, interesting and fun. The low sensitivity of the film made it necessary to slow down the process of taking each picture. As a result, I had to be more attentive, which again affected my attention to things like composition and lighting. As to the results, I enjoy the dark overall expression of the pictures. The dark tones are really dark, and capture the feeling of the norwegian winter, almost completely devoid of any sun.”
Credits: Mathias Jonstang Hordvei

Samuel Sjøen

Samuel chose to take his roll of Babylon Kino B&W everywhere he went. He finds himself looking for potential frames in his day-to-day life, rather than go and look for them. He used a Canon FTB and a 50 mm f1.8 lens.

Credits: Samuel Sjøen
“It's a very challenging film to shoot because of the very low ISO, but this also adds a lot of fun to the process. Restricting how, where and when you can shoot, forces you to be a lot more creative. I think I pushed the shutter speed a bit too much to get a good exposure, meaning that the results came out a bit more unsharp than I had hoped for, but this also created a very creamy and dreamy look which ended up being quite beautiful in its own way.”
Credits: Samuel Sjøen

Head over to our online shop to score some rolls of our Babylon Kino film.

written by lomocato on 2024-05-20 #gear #places #black-and-white #norway #b-w #scandinavia #nordic #low-iso #babylon-kino #iso-13

Mentioned Product

Babylon Kino B&W 35 mm ISO 13

Babylon Kino B&W 35 mm ISO 13

This panchromatic emulsion is perfect for practiced professionals and fledgling photographers alike. Suited for those who like to indulge in sharp detail, low grain and subtle gradient transitions, the Babylon Kino B&W Film captures soft tonal contrast, retaining attributes even in super bright scenarios.

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