The very first Lomographic 120 Black and White Film

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Black & white film yields that classic, old-school appeal that only film can faithfully reproduce. And shooting medium format means that every huge negative is absolutely bursting with detail, contrast, and subtle tones.

Black & white film yields that classic, old-school appeal that only film can faithfully reproduce. And shooting medium format means that every huge negative is absolutely bursting with detail, contrast, and subtle tones.

We’re thrilled to announce the arrival of our very first Lomographic 120 Black and White emulsion! With a 100ISO speed, it’s precisely calibrated to yield high-contrast images with deep, true blacks and dazzling highlights.

Its fine grain and high resolution ensure rich and powerful images – strong enough to knock your eyes clear out the back of your skull. Whether shot through a plastic Diana+ lens or a glass Seagull TLR lens, you’ll get truly stunning results which simplify the world around you and transport your senses back to the good ’ol days – if only for a fleeting moment.

To give you a solid idea of what this extra-special film is capable of, we’ve prepared a monochrome gallery for your enjoyment.

Have a look!

Available in packs of 3, 6, 15, 21

Go to the shop.

written by d_i_d on 2008-08-19 #news #gallery #medium-format #120 #lomofilm #b-w

7 Comments

  1. chaweemek
    chaweemek ·

    finally!!!

  2. mephisto19
    mephisto19 ·

    there is no 21 pack in the shop...
    but cool..... will order some soon

  3. graefin
    graefin ·

    Definitely worth a try!
    will buy some with my next order!

  4. anarchy
    anarchy ·

    Wow =) Very nice!! I'll have to get in on the action too...

  5. jiro84
    jiro84 ·

    Develop with D76 or C41 chemical???

  6. d_i_d
    d_i_d ·

    It is a Panchromatic B/W Film with ISO 100 that should be developed in Kodak D-76 or D-23 Developer.

  7. naitian
    naitian ·

    What about developing times? I already shot like 5 rolls but I haven't been able to develop them because of the developing times... Any idea?

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