Rachel Libeskind and Carmen Winant: Puzzles of the Self

Artists Rachel Libeskind and Carmen Winant are no strangers to the mixed media arts. With the use of the photographic image, both create their own series of collages visualizing womanhood and its meaning today.

Rachel Libeskind, Fluent But Not Rational, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 33 x 25 inches (83.82 x 63.5 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Pleasant, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 15 x 9 inches (38.1 x 22.86 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Not Adaptable, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 20 x 16 inches (50.8 x 40.64 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Reticent, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 19 x 21 inches (48.26 x 53.34 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Cheerful, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 16 x 11.5 inches (40.64 x 29.21 cm)

Both artists love to explore the potential of various mediums and marry them together. Ohio-based artist and writer Carmen Winant used installation and collages to 'examine feminist modes of survival and revolt'. Creating a conflicting, deviant narrative in society is how she wants to portray the feminine oppression and experience. At first sight, her works are made up of found photographs with women depicted to be engaging in certain activities.

There's an illustrative, mood board-like aesthetic as to how Winant created her collages. The pictures are decorated and muddled with handwritten messages and drawings, almost like results of therapy and self-healing.

Rachel Libeskind, Desire to Collect, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 33 x 24 inches (83.82 x 60.96 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Desire to Collect, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 33 x 24 inches (83.82 x 60.96 cm); Carmen Winant Hologram for living, 2019 Ink, graphite, correction fluid, watercolor crayon, gold leaf and found images on paper 42.25 x 28.38 inches framed (107.32 x 72.09 cm) 39.5 x 25.75 inches unframed (100.33 x 65.41 cm)

Meanwhile, the Milan-born, New York-based Rachel Libeskind utilizes the then-popular board game Physogs, in which its aim was to create various faces from puzzle pieces. Using the images found in the game, she puts her own artistic signature by playing around proportions. She enlarged the very small pieces and used acrylic paint to give new life to these old images. The colors are four-dimensional and surreal as she dissects each part of the face and studies expressions found in the fragments. She says:

"The aim of the game is to create faces and determine what emotions and moods they conveyed. I specifically did not want to create any faces - I wanted to dismember and fragment the facial parts in order to re-contextualize the features. When you look at yourself for too long in the mirror, your features stop making sense."
Rachel Libeskind, Keen Sense, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 33.5 x 23 inches (85.09 x 58.42 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Magnetic, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 11.5 x 13.25 inches (29.21 x 33.66 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Suave, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 9.5 x 11.5 inches (24.13 x 29.21 cm); Rachel Libeskind, Acquisitive, 2019, collage on Japanese paper with fabric hardener and acrylic airbrush pigment, 17 x 10.5 inches (43.18 x 26.67 cm); Carmen Winant, Hunger, 2019, charcoal, graphite, watercolor crayon and found images on paper, 31.75 x 23.75 inches framed (80.65 x 60.33 cm)

As Carmen focuses on putting the self back together, Rachel deconstructs. The collaborative theme may be found in a special display at the New York-based gallery Signs and Symbols.


For more of their experimental works, visit Carmen's website and Rachel's website. Images are with permission by Carmen and Rachel. All rights reserved to the artists.

2019-07-29 #people #photo-collage #rachel-libeskind #carmen-winant

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