Adrian Piper: Social Experiments on Images

New York-born artist and philosopher Adrian Piper shows the world her creations on conceptual and visual art that reflect society's issues on race, gender, class, and identity. Although the majority of her works are deemed provocative due to being socio-politically charged, Piper opened her comprehensive retrospective on image-making in New York.

Adrian Piper. Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #3 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.; Adrian Piper. Everything #2.8. 2003. Photocopied photograph on graph paper, sanded with sandpaper, overprinted with inkjet text, 8.5″ x 11″ (21.6 x 27.9 cm). Private Collection. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin; Adrian Piper. Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #1 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.

Before taking philosophy for her doctorate degree at Harvard University, Piper studied sculpture and painting at the School of Visual Arts in New York. She came from a conceptualist background thanks to experimental artists Sol LeWitt and Yvonne Rainer as her influences.

Piper began with her art shows and explicit depiction of multiracial roots and gender through performance, such as the piece The Mythic Being (1972-1981). It was in this performance Piper would be seen walking the street as a light-skinned African-American man, with a mustache and afro. The piece included photographs of her alter ego in which she wrote personal thought bubbles. Her other notable works include Self-Portrait Exaggerating My Negroid Features (1981), Funk Lessons (1983), and My Calling (Card) (1986–90), all which tackled her recurring themes of ostracism, racism, and otherness.

For over 50 years Piper has put her hand to a number of different creative techniques such as drawing, photography, paperwork, video, multimedia installation, performance, painting, sculpture, and sound. The genius of multifaceted skillset can be seen in the Adrian Piper: A Synthesis of Intuitions, 1965–2016 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, which runs until July 22.

Adrian Piper Catalysis III. 1970. Documentation of the performance. Two gelatin silver prints and text mounted on colored paper. Overall 8 1/2 × 11 in. (21.6 × 27.9 cm). Photographs by Rosemary Mayer. Collection Thomas Erben, New York. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin; Adrian Piper. Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #2 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.; Adrian Piper. Safe #1–4. 1990. Mixed-medium installation. Screenprinted text on four black-and-white photographs, mounted on foam core and affixed to the corners of a room, with audio. 30 1/4 x 42 in (76.8 x 106.7 cm); 24 5/8 x 39 ¼ in (62.5 x 99.7 cm); 30 7/16 x 24 15/16 in. (77.3 x 63.1 cm); and 44 5/16 x 36in. (112.6 x 99.1 cm). Detail: #4 of 4. Collection Adrian Piper Research Archive. Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.; Adrian Piper. The Mythic Being: I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear. 1975. Oil crayon on gelatin silver print. 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm). Collection Thomas Erben, New York. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin

Images are from the press kit.

2018-04-24 #news #photography #collage #adrian-piper

More Interesting Articles