Celebrating #25YearsOfLomography with #LomoWallNewHampshire

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My first Lomo Wall...

I bought my first LC-A in the early nineties after reading about the camera in a magazine. After leaving it on a plane, I immediately ordered another as I did not want to be without one.

And then the Age of the Digital Camera came upon us and the LC-A did not see much action for some time. But in the last two years, I've come to take it out shooting more and more and I have it nearby most of the time now.

When I read of the 25th Years of Lomography LomoWall exhibition I instantly knew that I wanted to participate. So I submitted a few of my own images to the competition and registered to create a wall. Living in a small New England town doesn't usually come with many places to display such a project, I was lucky to know of a newly opened art gallery in town. I approached the owner of Granite Town Gallery and gave him a bit of history of Lomography and he was intrigued and offered me a space to display the wall.

The LomoWall I had in mind would need 500 individual images total. Using repeats, that would mean about 100 to 150 unique photos would need to be selected from the hundreds that were sent for use. I wanted to keep in the spirit of Lomography and not try to judge every image so I decided to just take a random approach. I rolled the dice. Literally. I opened the first file, rolled two dice and counted down that number and selected the image. Rolled again, counted along, and selected the next image. Over and over. After about 20 rolls, I switched to a single die for the next batch, and then back to two. So on and so forth going through all the images. Ultimately printing five copies of each selection, 720 in total.

The only exception was when there was a panorama image, it was converted into a series of 4x6 prints to be sure to fit the pattern of the wall. There are five panoramas repeated and spread over five of the 10 panels.

With the photos in hand, it was time to figure out how to hang them. In discussions with Kimo Lee, the gallery owner, we had several ideas and settled on 10 pieces of foam core boards that measured 30" x 40" in a two row five column collection. The final dimensions measuring 80" x 150".

The layout began with the panorama images which were placed in a staggered and repeated pattern over several rows on five different panels. Then I grouped some images that had similar color tones blues, greens, purples, orange, black & whites to have some thematic starting points. We just started grabbing images and working them onto a panel. Some with definite patterns and others without any real plan. With the exception of a single photo of an LC-A in the middle of the wall, every image has at least four copies. With all of the panels filled, we reviewed and changed out a couple of photos for some others that felt like a better fit. And then began the mounting process.

To mount the photos we used a spray adhesive (Eclectic E6000 Spray Adhesive) that worked very well and has held up over the weeks of being on display. This process went very smoothly and took just a few hours to complete.

Next we needed to hang the panels on the gallery wall. For this we used Velcro (hook and loop) tape on the back of the panels. We placed a level center line on the wall and pushed each panel into place. Very simple and easy to take down when the showing is complete.

Once the wall was installed, it took on a very different perspective than it had while on the floor. Though not nearly as large as many of the other displays, it was impressive to see the mosaic come to life. Stepping back to examine the whole piece and then see the patterns created was such a unique experience.

We held an opening night reception with a nice group coming out to view the wall.

This was such a fun project to put together. Very happy I could join with so many others around the world. My biggest surprise of the whole event is that there were not more LomoWalls created.

Cheers to 25 Years of Lomography!

2017-12-12 #news #places #lomowall #25-years-of-lomography

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3 Comments

  1. sirio174
    sirio174 ·

    great work!

  2. guanatos
    guanatos ·

    this is awesome! keep spreading the Lomo Love!

  3. lomodesbro
    lomodesbro ·

    Great achievement and thanks for describing & documenting the wall build

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