29 Academy Award Nominations for Films Shot in Kodak Film Stock

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Nine films shot from the Kodak Film Stock received 29 Academy Award nominations, a feat Kodak Motion Picture and Entertainment is currently celebrating for the continuous support of film.

The films "La La Land", "Fences", "Hidden Figures", "Jackie", "Nocturnal Animals", "Loving", "Silence", "Suicide Squad" and "Hail Caesar" were captured in Kodak 35mm and 16mm Motion Picture Film stock. Additionally in award season, 9 out of 14 films at the Golden Globes were also capture in film; 9 movies shot on film received 34 British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) nominations. At the end of the day, the big winner among them is Damien Chazelle's "La La Land", having a total of 11 BAFTA and 14 Academy Award Nominations.

“Movies captured on film are winning nominations and awards at a disproportionately high rate,” Steve Bellamy, President of Kodak Motion Picture and Entertainment, stated in a press release. “The best artists are choosing film, but it goes beyond their choices. You don’t just see film, you feel it. There is an emotive dynamic with film that makes heartfelt moments more heartfelt, joyful moments more joyful, sad moments sadder. Film benefits from the world’s greatest motion picture artists using it, but the world’s greatest motion picture artists also make better movies because they use film.”

These nominations play a significant part on elevating the relevance of the film stock in a majorly digitally-driven industry. The resurgence marks as film artists coming to understand the value of the celluloid in visual storytelling.

The 29 Academy Award nominations are the following:

BEST PICTURE:

“Fences”
“Hidden Figures”
“La La Land”

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE:

Ryan Gosling, “La La Land”
Denzel Washington, “Fences”

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE:

Ruth Negga, “Loving”
Natalie Portman, “Jackie”
Emma Stone, “La La Land”

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

Michael Shannon, “Nocturnal Animals”

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE:

Viola Davis, “Fences”
Octavia Spencer, “Hidden Figures”

CINEMATOGRAPHY:

Linus Sandgren, “La La Land”
Rodrigo Prieto, “Silence”

COSTUME DESIGN:

Madeline Fontaine, “Jackie”
Mary Zophres, “La La Land”

DIRECTING:

Damien Chazelle, “La La Land”

FILM EDITING:

Tom Cross, “La La Land”

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING:

Alessandro Bertolazzi, Giorgio Gregorini and Christopher Nelson, “Suicide Squad”

MUSIC:

Mica Levi, “Jackie”
Justin Hurwitz, “La La Land”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG):

Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul. “City of Stars” from “La La Land”
Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek, Justin Paul. “Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” from “La La Land”

PRODUCTION DESIGN:

Jess Gonchor, Nancy Haigh, “Hail, Caesar!”
David Wasco, Sandy Reynolds – Wasco, “La La Land”

SOUND EDITING:

Ai-Ling Lee, Mildred latrou Morgan, “La La Land”

SOUND MIXING:

Andy Nelson, Ai-Ling Lee and Steve A. Marrow, “La La Land”

WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY):

August Wilson, “Fences”
Allison Schroeder, Theodore Melfi, “Hidden Figures”

WRITING (ORIGNAL SCREENPLAY):

Damien Chazelle, “La La Land”

Additionally, the prevalence of film is also seen in smaller-budget and short movies, such as "Beach Rats", "Golden Exits", "Person to Person", and "Call Me By Your Name".


Information is sourced from Kodak's press center.

2017-02-02 #culture #news #cinema #film #movies #kodak #filmmaking #cinematography #kodak-film-stock

3 Comments

  1. hervinsyah
    hervinsyah ·

    does fuji eterna 250d are the same with this kodak vision 250d? there is one long time question are in my mind. When the first time using cinestill film I e6 process it because some people told me if using cinestill then e6 process it the photo will turn out perfect, but when I did it all of the photo turn into dark purple monochrome color. Then some people said that even it's cinematic film but the cinestill are color negative film so just c41 it. But yesterday at Indonesia roll film online forum there is someone who ask the fuji eterna 250d film reseller could it be use c41 cross process for this film? The the reseller showing the example photo that using c41 process. In my personal opinion the result not as cinematic as cinestill c41 result that I saw a lot at lomography.com. So, the point is which one is the right process for cinematic film, e6 or c41? many thanks before =)

  2. broom
    broom ·

    this is great!!

  3. junpx
    junpx ·

    Like the 35mm film you can shoot in your still camera/SLR, movie film can be either transparency or negative film. Kodak 250D is a color negative film. Cinestill is also a color negative film, and requires the C41 chemicals to process it. Movie color negative films, like the Kodak ones they still offer, probably could be processed in C41, but I'm pretty sure they run through a processing system using a chemistry specifically for these films (ECN? if I can remember correctly). Cross-processing Cinestill in E6, like cross-processing any negative film in E6, would produce outrageous color-shifts like the purple you described. And, if you do not push-process your negative film in E6 by +4 or more stops, you will get a too dark and unusable transparency. Bottom line: you will best, if not predictable results if you process negative films in C41, and transparency films in E6.

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