Returning to Japan in the Provoke-Era

2017-01-19 1

Defined by hard-edged and full-on contrasted black and white, the Provoke movement began with the short-lived magazine "Provoke". Although having only made three issues in nine months (November 1968 to August 1969), the magazine is deemed responsible for the progressive art photography and cultural criticism taking place in the 1960's and 1970's. It was a terrific source not only for literary pieces of nationwide political protests, but as well as of photography.

Provoke members Daidô Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira, Takahiko Okada, Yutaka Takanashi, and Kôji Taki sought all of these during the magazine's run.They made connections between photography, political protests and performance in a post-war Japan. This also gave light and new meaning to the works of Shômei Tômatsu, a mentor for many Provoke members, international photographer Eikô Hosoe and the now-famous, fan-favorite yet controversial Nobuyoshi Araki.

Catch the upcoming exhibition Provoke: Photography in Japan between Protest and Performance, 1960–75 at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, Jan. 28.

Takashi Hamaguchi. Okinawa Day, in Ochanomizu, April 28, 1969, 1969. The Art Institute of Chicago, through prior gift of David C. and Sarajean Ruttenberg. © Takashi Hamaguchi.
Artist unknown. Protest Surrounding the Construction of Narita Airport, about 1969. The Art Institute of Chicago, Photography Gala Fund; Artist unknown. Protest Surrounding the Construction of Narita Airport, about 1969. The Art Institute of Chicago, Photography Gala Fund; Artist unknown. Protest Surrounding the Construction of Narita Airport, about 1969. The Art Institute of Chicago, Photography Gala Fund.
Nobuyoshi Araki. Untitled (C-58-17-1), 1973. The Art Institute of Chicago, restricted gift of Kenneth and Christine Tanaka. © Nobuyoshi Araki; Yutaka Takanashi. The Beatles, Marunouchi Shochiku Theatre, Chidyoda-ku (Toyko-jin), April 4, 1965. The Art Institute of Chicago, Photography Gala Fund. © Yutaka Takanashi; Kazuo Kitai. Female Farmer Taking a Stand against the Riot Police Water Cannon from Riot Police from the series Sanrizuka, 1970. The Art Institute of Chicago, Kenneth and Christine Tanaka and Photography Purchase Funds. © 1970 Kazuo Kitai; Kōji Enokura. Symptom–Column, Body (P.W. No. 51), 1972. The Art Institute of Chicago, Photography Gala Fund. © Michiyo Enokura; Yutaka Takanashi. Untitled from the series Towards the City, 1969. Private collection. © Yutaka Takanashi, courtesy | PRISKA PASQUER, Cologne.
Takuma Nakahira. Night, 1969. The Art Institute of Chicago, through prior gifts of Yasuhiro and Shigeru Ishimoto and David C. and Sarajean Ruttenberg. © Gen Nakahira; Eikō Hosoe. Kamaitachi #22, 1965. The Art Institute of Chicago, Promised gift of a private collection; © Eikō Hosoe.Eikō Hosoe. Kamaitachi #31, 1968. The Art Institute of Chicago, Promised gift of a private collection. © Eikō Hosoe.

The show will run through April 30.


Images used are from the press kit.

written by lomographymagazine on 2017-01-19 #culture #news #black-and-white #b-w #black-and-white-photography #japanese-photography #provoke-era #provoke-photography

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One Comment

  1. hervinsyah
    hervinsyah ·

    =O Nobuyoshi Araki attend The Beatles concert in Budokan \m/ 1968 and 1969 where white Album and Abbey Road released

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