Left Brain Photography

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In my previous article on right brain photography, I made some examples of photos taken using mainly the right hemisphere of our brain. These photos were taken by instinct, relying mainly on emotions and empathy of joyful people, and I was being emotionally involved in the events. In this article, I’m going to show to you some photos taken using the rational parts of my brain, the left hemisphere. This is the second article in a series of three.

In this second article, I present to you some of my photos taken with a rational and logical approach. In this case the use of the left hemisphere of the brain is dominant. There is a great care in the study of the composition and the combination of colors, more attention in the choice of depth of field, the desire to communicate a thought or to show a social situation, and the idea to telling a story prevails over instinctive and emotional aspects. As a reference, I always recommend to you the excellent book of Kathryn Marx: “Right Brain, Left Brain Photography”.

1. The first photo has a social value. For many years, the lake of Como is obscured by a construction of some anti flood bulkheads and the wall of the yard denies the view of the lake. This couple is near this wall, in front of the sign “The new promenade” (“The new lake” in Italian) . This photo is emblematic of the general indifference to the problem. Very few people have protested to review the lake.

Credits: sirio174

2. Here the rational side of the mind has been used to study the composition, putting the lamp in the centre of the photo as the main subject of the image.

Credits: sirio174

3. Also in this image of the beach of Noli, a medieval village in Liguria, I used a rational approach to compose the image with the boat of the fishermen in the foreground and the sunbathers in the background.

Credits: sirio174

4. Another picture carefully studied is taken in front of the Bourguiba Mausoleum in Monastir, Tunisia. The open gate invite visitors to enter, and gives a sense of depth to the image.

Credits: sirio174

5. This modern and ecological “taxi” made ​​me smile, and of course, it was immediately the subject of my photos. However, this is not a photo taken using the instinctive side of my brain. The subject was standing, there was no hurry, and I studied the composition carefully, avoiding disturbing elements such as garbage baskets and some motorcycles parked on the right side.

Credits: sirio174

6. When I saw the plane parked and some birds fluttering in search of food I have been patient. I have waited until a pigeon rested on the wall, because I had already decided to name this photo: “Being able to fly … with or without (natural) wings.”

Credits: sirio174

7. In this public demonstration of free climbing I split the composition into two equal parts, using the two colours of the wall to create a symmetry.

Credits: sirio174

8. In the case of the beautiful early Christian Basilica of Galliano, a few miles from my house, I deliberately played on the depth of field to highlight the flowers in the foreground. The seasons pass, but this architectural masterpiece, deliberately blurred, withstands for centuries, exorcising the flowing of the time!

Credits: sirio174

9. The snow is always fascinating. Even more so if the photographic composition is made using few colors. Here you have an almost total two-colour images (the white snow and the brown tones of the trees). I tried different lenses, then I opted for a wide-angle lens for its great depth of field, and to enhance the perspective, putting in the background the beautiful dome of the Cathedral of my city.

Credits: sirio174

10. Here, the rational choice was to choose a rather closed diaphragm for focusing the tree in the foreground, with its fresh spring leaves, together with the background, the beautiful lake of my city Como,

Credits: sirio174

11. During a public demonstration of yoga, I have seen this colour contrast. The small, delicate and white girl’s feet are held in place by the firm hands of the instructor. All joined together, in a common effort, in a public event for charity. A photo that reminds me the style of the great Italian photographer Oliviero Toscani, who inspired me.

Credits: sirio174

Stay tuned for the next article!

written by sirio174 on 2013-01-24 #lomography #kathryn-marx #lifestyle #brain #logical #analogue-lifestyle #hemispere #rational #photography #thinking #left-side

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