Animated Analogues #1: Beginnings

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This is the start of my animation project: figuring out it’s dynamics and nuances, how shooting to animate affects perception of static shooting, advantages and disadvantages of the method, and plans for the future of Animated Analogues.

Following on from my series introduction, I’ll talk about the project’s beginnings. It’s easy to forget to take three shots at a time of any given subject, so I’m planning to really chuck myself into this project and take three pictures of EVERYTHING in the future. At the beginning of many an endeavour, you’ve got to take the time to muck around and figure out the best way to do things. With my first attempts I ended up with some rubbish animations, but a few I really liked. Here are some of my first animations as I ventured into the thing:

Pigeons at Raynes Park station

Offshoots from my Bubbles In The Wind series

Fisheye double exposure fun

I quickly discovered that it can be quite difficult to make decent animations with fisheye images, as the distorted angles can make resulting animations rather warped and jarring. They can work well though, you just have to experiment. I’d reckon that keeping the camera still is the best way to go about it. I found that disposable cameras were kinder to me, much more forgiving of moving angles.

I thought it would be a good idea to use another photo project to shoot animation frames around, as then I’d have a theme and subject to concentrate on and could thus (hopefully) get more shot. So I was doing a shoot called IDOLS on Wimbledon Common and I shot some stuff for animations alongside it, and this turned out really well. The resulting animations related to each other, and I felt it was effective to essentially incorporate a narrative into this set of animations.



















Here are some individual frames:

As much as I like the way these turned out within the context of a specific photo project, I also really like the way those earlier images take on a sort of diary quality. I think the natural conclusion here is that I need to force myself to capture everything in three frames, relentlessly. It also opens up a window into the immense possibilities for variation with every single photograph. Taking three pictures might allow you to get a better static shot too, or it may provide you with a lot of awful pictures and feel like it’s eating up all your money in development costs (the bane of my life). But I think it’s worth it, it makes you look at things differently and, above all, it’s fun.

Photo and words by Lil Ashton. Lil is an artist from London and enjoys biscuits.

written by ashdinosaur on 2012-03-06 #disposable #lifestyle #london #photography #analogue #regular-contributors #beginnings #animated-analogues #fun #animation

3 Comments

  1. sidsel
    sidsel ·

    The woods ones are creepy in a good way! Nice!

  2. sommer
    sommer ·

    interesting project!

  3. radiactive
    radiactive ·

    Whoah, what a beautiful forest! I enjoy your work very much, it is so fun! :D

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