Join the race for amazing prizes and everlasting glory and submit your finest photos to our ongoing competitions such as Road to Photokina 2016 - Dualities. Good luck!

A CanoScan Scanning Guide – Part 3: Cross Processed Slide Film

2012-01-20 6

This is a how to guide for anyone struggling with their CanoScans. This is for Cross Processed Slide Film and the third installment for my tipster. Read on!

Switch your scanner on and get it set up to start scanning your film (Refer to Part 1 for details).
Now that you are set up to start scanning your film follow the next step for cross processed slide film scanning.

Cross Processed Slide Film

Slide film or colour reversal film is film with high contrasts especially when cross processed, this means that instead of developing it in E6 you develop it in C41 and your negatives become negative not positive.
There are 2 ways to scan Cross processed slide film and they will both give you different results and colours – so try both out and see what you prefer.

Scanning Option 1

First place your film in the scanning mask and select preview (the blue button at the bottom). Then use the selection tool to adjust the borders of your images as the scanner does not understand spinner photos for example so you will need to make the selection larger. When scanning any images with sprocket holes make sure you do not select over the sprocket holes in the beginning only select the centre image to work on, I will explain in a few steps. Your settings are as follows:

Input Settings
Select Source: Monochrome Negative Film/ Colour Negative Film – play around with both depending on what you like
Scan Area: Auto Detect
Color Mode: COLOR – make sure you select colour not grayscale otherwise that is exactly what you will get.
The dimensions setting should be set already and I work in mm.

Output Settings
Output Resolution: This is really up to you, I work at 1200dpi as a general unless I need very high resolution (bear in mind the higher the dpi the longer the scan will take)
Output Size: Flexible, dimensions should once again be set and at 100%
Data Size: This changes according to your settings – you don’t change it, it is there to let you know how big the file will be.

Image Settings
Image Adjustment: Photo
Unsharp Mask: On
Remove Dust and Scratches (FARE): None
Fading Correction: None
Grain Correction: None
Backlight Correction: None
Exposure/ Tone Settings – press the down arrow for more options
Manual Exposure: Here you can alter the exposure of your images before scanning by ticking the box. The higher you make the percentage the less exposed the image becomes and the lower you make it the more exposed it becomes. Apply the tone value to all crops.

This apply button is crucial when scanning sprocket holes, if you make a selection with sprocket holes you will see that your image becomes washed out and over exposed, so as I mentioned earlier edit your images without the sprockets selected when you are happy with your result press apply and it will save your settings and you can then stretch your selections to include the sprocket holes and you will see your image remains the way you liked it.

High Quality: Off
You will see a range of picture buttons at the bottom that deal more with levels, curves, saturation, etc – use them if you need. Now you are ready to scan your cross processed slide film so press the green scan button.

Scanning Option 2

This method is far more time consuming however I generally prefer the colours I get. You will need a strip of ordinary colour negative film for this. Make sure you choose a well exposed one that is not over or under, do not use coloursplash photo’s or photo’s taken with a flash or mask. Your best bet is a daylight photo, shot with 400 iso film.

First place the colour negative film strip in the scanning mask and select preview (the blue button at the bottom). Then use the selection tool to adjust the borders of your images as the scanner does not understand spinner photos for example so you will need to make the selection larger. When scanning any images with sprocket holes make sure you do not select over the sprocket holes in the beginning only select the centre image to work on, I will explain in a few steps. Your settings are as follows:

Input Settings
Select Source: Colour Negative Film
Scan Area: Auto Detect
Color Mode: Color
The dimensions setting should be set already and I work in mm.

Output Settings
Output Resolution: This is really up to you, I work at 1200dpi as a general unless I need very high resolution (bear in mind the higher the dpi the longer the scan will take)
Output Size: Flexible, dimensions should once again be set and at 100%
Data Size: This changes according to your settings – you don’t change it, it is there to let you know how big the file will be.

Image Settings
Image Adjustment: Photo
Unsharp Mask: On
Remove Dust and Scratches (FARE): None
Fading Correction: None
Grain Correction: None
Backlight Correction: None
Exposure/ Tone Settings – press the down arrow for more options
Manual Exposure: Here you can alter the exposure of your images before scanning by ticking the box. The higher you make the percentage the less exposed the image becomes and the lower you make it the more exposed it becomes. Apply the tone value to all crops.

This apply button is essential for this method of scanning, once you are happy with your settings press APPLY. Now remove the colour negative strip and place your cross processed film in the scanner and press preview again. You will see your colours are brighter and very contrasted. You can now scan your images. Do not reset your tone values unless you need to adjust exposure – this is where the time comes in as you will need to rescan the colour negative strip and adjust the settings then apply and change films again – however it is worth it for certain images but not for others – you will just have to see as you go.

The apply button as mentioned previously is also crucial scanning sprocket holes, if you make a selection with sprocket holes in your colour negative film you will see that your image becomes washed out and over exposed, so as I mentioned earlier edit your images without the sprockets selected when you are happy with your result press apply and it will save your settings and you can then stretch your selections to include the sprocket holes and you will see your image remains the way you liked it.

High Quality: Off

Now you are ready to scan your cross processed slide film so press the green scan button.

SOME OTHER GENERAL RULES:

  • Save you photos after each roll scanned as the software can crash- doesn’t happen often but it has happened once to me and it is annoying.
  • Always clean the scanner before scanning to avoid hairs and dust – I clearly forget to do this often if you look at some of my oh so dusty photos!
  • Last but not least EXPERIMENT – there are many little buttons to play with so see what works for you, you never know what you may come up with.

Read more scanning tips for colour negative and colour reversal.

written by nicx on 2012-01-20 #gear #tutorials #scanning #diy #film #tipster #xpro #tutorial #canoscan

6 Comments

  1. tiro8
    tiro8 ·

    thanks for these tipsters. i'm bookmarking them on my computer so i can refer to them when i scan. really appreciate the work you put into them.

  2. supercalifragilisticexpialidocious
    supercalifragilisticexpialidocious ·

    this was very helpful, thank you!

  3. begutierrez
    begutierrez ·

    Great tipster! Thank you.

  4. blacksburg25
    blacksburg25 ·

    Thank you!!!!

  5. lemoni
    lemoni ·

    This is it! Thank you so much for sharing it!

  6. kleinerkaries
    kleinerkaries ·

    thank you so much! my photos wouldn't be up here without your help.

More Interesting Articles

  • Tipster: DIY X-Pro Redscale

    written by rancliffhasenza on 2015-09-27 #gear #tutorials
    Tipster: DIY X-Pro Redscale

    Browsing through the Lomography website, you can find a lot of redscale shots, which are all done on color negative films. I asked myself if it’s possible to redscale a slide or chrome film and then cross process it. (And yes, it is.) In this tipster I’m going to teach you how to create the bloodiest homemade redscale film I've ever come across.

    2015-09-27 10
  • Serendipity Exhibition by Toby Mason

    written by lomographysoholondon on 2015-09-10 #news
    Serendipity Exhibition by Toby Mason

    Toby Mason (aka fotobes) is a Brighton-based photographer who embraces the aesthetics of film photography. He mostly shoots with the LC-A+ using a range of slide films, cross processing them to create rich, highly saturated colours. His work has been featured on the BBC website and Hungry Eye Magazine. Join us for the opening night on Thursday, September 17 from 6 p.m.

    2015-09-10 2
  • Instantly Optimal: Portraits

    written by Lomography on 2016-03-18 #gear #tutorials
    Instantly Optimal: Portraits

    The third installment of the Instantly Optimal Tipster series shows you how to capture candid moments and perfect a posed picture with your Lomo’Instant Wide!

  • Shop News

    LomoLab: Panoramic & Sprocket Development Services

    LomoLab: Panoramic & Sprocket Development Services

    Panoramic shots are here ready to be processed by our dedicated team experts! Development, prints and scans included. (Service availability depends on your markets)

  • Cross Processed to a T: Agfa CT Precisa

    written by Jill Tan Radovan on 2016-02-01 #gear
    Cross Processed to a T: Agfa CT Precisa

    With the right composition and the perfect subject, cross processing the Agfa CT Precisa guarantees spectacular, awe-inspiring results. From the delicate and scenic to the intimate and mundane, here are some views captured on cross-processed Agfa CT Precisa slide film.

    2016-02-01 2
  • Lomography X "Dopamine" by Third Eye Blind Exclusive Contest

    written by mike_mytnick on 2015-08-26 #news
    Lomography X "Dopamine" by Third Eye Blind Exclusive Contest

    Lomography teams up with acclaimed rock band Third Eye Blind to celebrate the release of its new album, Dopamine, by hosting an exclusive photo contest! The prizes include a La Sardina Camera and Flash Splendour, Dopamine on CD and Dopamine T-Shirts! Read on to see how you can participate in this rumble.

    2015-08-26 1
  • How to Develop Photos on Stone in a Darkroom

    written by tomas_bates on 2016-02-17 #gear #tutorials
    How to Develop Photos on Stone in a Darkroom

    I have always loved the idea of seeing my photos on stone and other natural materials. So, a few months ago, I began googling how it could be done. This is how I discovered (and fell in love with) liquid emulsion. Liquid emulsion is photographic emulsion which you can melt down and paint on any surface. You can then expose an image and develop it using traditional darkroom chemicals. In this article, I would like to explain the process a little, so that if you are also interested in giving this fun process a go, you can!

    2016-02-17 12
  • Shop News

    Check the New Super Sampler Black Panther!

    Check the New Super Sampler Black Panther!

    The ultra-lightweight, low-maintenance 35mm camera that fits perfectly in your hand for some wild and spontaneous shooting!

  • My First Lomo Affair: Jmcedo and his LC-A+

    written by Eunice Abique on 2015-09-13
    My First Lomo Affair: Jmcedo and his LC-A+

    Joan Manel Cedó is an avid fan of extreme sports. He has been a rock climber for two decades and has also gained interest in kitesurfing over the years. In both sports, he tries to incorporate his passion for photography. In this instalment of My First Lomo Affair, he talks about how he chance upon the carefree style of shooting with the LC-A+ and all the adventures that followed this discovery.

    2015-09-13 2
  • Black and White Photography: The Forms of the World

    written by lomographymagazine on 2016-01-19
    Black and White Photography: The Forms of the World

    Colors may be amped to look unreal, like nothing of this world. Shots may be doubled, cross-processed, post-processed, mixed up into collages. The possibilities are infinite, yet some photographers still prefer black and white. Even in 2016, it is an ode to classic values of precision and balance. Light and shadow must be one pleasing dance. And just like in a well-choreographed piece, forms are obvious or playing coy. It all depends on how you're looking.

    2016-01-19
  • Awe-Inspiring Lomographs Courtesy of the Lomography XPro 200 ISO (35mm) Rumble Winners

    written by lomography on 2015-10-26 #news
    Awe-Inspiring Lomographs Courtesy of the Lomography XPro 200 ISO (35mm) Rumble Winners

    New to shooting with a slide film? The intense, citrusy palette of these photographs is good enough reason to place the Lomography Xpro 200 ISO (35mm) film on your list of slide films to try!

    2015-10-26 7
  • Shop News

    LC-A+ & LC-W Accessories

    LC-A+ & LC-W Accessories

    Combine your LC-A+ or LC-W Camera with great, fun Accessories and get 15% Discount on all Lomography Accessories when bought together with the Camera!

  • Bad But Good: An Interview with Patrick Tsai

    written by Sunshine Reyes on 2016-08-03 #people
    Bad But Good: An Interview with Patrick Tsai

    Patrick Tsai is an American Photographer based in Japan. In this interview, we get to know more about him and his latest photo project, Barnacle Island. It's his third installment to his photo diary series about rescuing an abandoned dog on the beach and moving to a remote island in Japan.

    2016-08-03 1
  • LC-A 120 and Pinhole Film Swap with Toby Mason and Mike McLean

    written by Lomography London on 2015-11-20 #tutorials
    LC-A 120 and Pinhole Film Swap with Toby Mason and Mike McLean

    Film photography fanatics Toby Mason and Mike McLean worked together on their latest project, a film swap using the LC-A 120 and a 120 pinhole camera. Read their step-by-step guide to getting excellent alignment and see the stunning results.

    8
  • Lomo LC-A Moments (Part 2)

    written by Eunice Abique on 2016-06-20
    Lomo LC-A Moments (Part 2)

    Over the years, the LC-A evolved into a quiet witness to touching moments. A constant companion on life-changing events. A trusty keeper of once-in-a-lifetime memories. For its 32nd birthday, lomographers from across the globe narrate how this analog wonder became a part of their own history.

    2016-06-20 9