Likes

  • #12502664

    shared by paiao on 2011-01-25

    1
  • #12502666

    shared by paiao on 2011-01-25

  • #12502667

    shared by paiao on 2011-01-25

  • #12502668

    shared by paiao on 2011-01-25

  • tree

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    when i look at this photo i feel summer

  • a bbq party

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    where I was working..summer.. '08? weather was amazing

  • mom in the kitchen

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    i love the summer outside the window

  • Freyzi

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    my friend being very handsome while I'm not.

  • close up

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    to my face

  • looking out the window

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    memories from school.

  • R and myself

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

  • party

    shared by miriampetra on 2011-01-25

    party at my friends house. i have a lot of party photos...

  • sombras

    shared by rdelarbrel on 2009-02-03

    1
  • #12504644

    shared by rloic on 2011-01-25

  • #12505350

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

    2
  • #12505352

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

    5
  • #12505355

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505357

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

    1
  • #12505361

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505364

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505366

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505369

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505373

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505375

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505381

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505383

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • #12505385

    shared by werriston on 2011-01-25

    Every year, a couple dozen Melbournians drive North to the banks of the Murray, inflate a couple dozen toy rafts and other floatation devices, tie some rope to a floating esky full of beer, and let the current take them downstream for the better part of three hours. This year, I decided to take my Holga along, and wrapped it in a plastic zip-lock bag in case of splashing. I only had two rolls of 120, so just before we launched our flimsy vessels I grabbed a roll of 35 from my bag and stuffed it into my pocket. Moments after we set off, the sky opened up and we were stung with freezing torrential rain for 45 minutes. I rattled off both rolls of medium format pretty quickly, clumsily unloading and reloading them in the rain whilst bobbing on the river and trying not to tip my tiny inflatable lilo. I realised too late that the plastic bag I'd used to keep the camera dry was actually doing the opposite. It retained a huge amount of water - enough to ensure the camera and both 120 films were saturated. So by the time I got around to loading this roll of 35, my lens and viewfinder were completely fogged with condensation, and the inside of the camera was full of bright blue chemical-coloured rainwater. I had also forgotten to bring my 35mm mask and back, so I just loaded the film loosely without any padding or mask and used a bit of old gaffer tape I found stuck to the Holga's body to cover the red window on the back (which, in my haste, I put on upside down). Eventually the rain stopped, and a couple of hours later we arrived at our destination downstream. I put the exposed films and camera in the sunniest spot I could find to dry them off, and that night I rewound the film by hand in the dark, though I'm pretty sure it was exposed to light from the moon, the campfire, and a friend's torch. The rolls of 120 are still damp, and I'm trying to figure out how to get them processed.

  • Antwerp

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-27

  • no access

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-27

  • dark river

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-27

  • Poles

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-18

    this was tampered with...

  • The sticks

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-17

  • City of Colour

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-17

  • The Nile

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-17

  • The Projects

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-17

  • My Home, My Castle

    shared by resistance on 2003-05-17

  • The Rules

    shared by jejexx on 2008-11-22

    Just obey the fucking rules...

  • queen

    shared by crestallion on 2008-02-20

    nice building with obey wheat paste

  • #12506423

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506424

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506425

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506426

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506427

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506428

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506429

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506430

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #12506431

    shared by eringreif on 2011-01-25

  • #3453195

    shared by camoaero on 2008-02-09

  • #3453201

    shared by camoaero on 2008-02-09

  • #3453209

    shared by camoaero on 2008-02-09