"The making of..."

This picture shows how I approached this album. I collected a bunch of colourful autumn leaves that were lying around outside my house and glued them onto an A3 piece of card, then shot a 24-exposure roll of film zoomed in on various parts of the leaf collage. (There were originally a lot more leaves on the card, but many had fallen off in the wind by the time I took this, the final shot on the roll.) After that, I rewound the film and reloaded it (trying, not completely successfully, to align it in exactly the same position as the first time I'd loaded it - this is a technique I still have to master, so any advice is welcome, please!), then went for a walkabout shooting the random stuff you see as the second layer. A simple but pretty effective technique, especially when using such a vibrant colour film as the Kodak Ultramax 400 I used here. Hope you like the shots - I sure had fun making them!


  1. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    P.S. The colours were a lot more vibrant on my PC screen than they look on my iPad... hmmm.

  2. vici
    vici ·

    I know! My new x-tungsten album looks perfect in photoshop; but then, loaded and viewed here my pictures look overly vibrant, not a pretty as they really are. I wonder if lomography automatically displays our pics with an extra, vibrant glow... apart from that my monitor at work shows colors differently than my laptop at home. I suppose they all have different settings.
    Anyway Buckshot, this is a lovely album and I really appreciate the "how to's".

  3. crevans27
    crevans27 ·

    Great album! I love it :-)

  4. alburnkat
    alburnkat ·

    Brilliant!! I wish I had had this idea before all our leaves had dried up and blown away. I must remember for next year!! Thanks again for sharing your brilliance. ;-)

  5. weleasewoger72
    weleasewoger72 ·

    Great album Buck! The best way to align the film correctly is to draw a line on the film exactly where the film leaves the cannister. After you rewind the film just pull it out until you see the line again. Works for me anyway! (3 masks coming your way real soon).

  6. dida
    dida ·

    really nice ;)

  7. grazie
    grazie ·

    great album buckshot!

  8. gauthierdumonde
    gauthierdumonde ·

    Great album. When I rewind film for use in another camera I never care about aligning. I like the overlap. If I don't want overlap I use a Nikon F5. Instead of pushing R1 and R2 (D2 (wohaa)) You just press R1 and rewind manually. You will see the digitscount back. The pics are always perfectly aligned. I tried the same with the F4 and it only works sometimes. Since you have an F100, This should be possible !

  9. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    @weleasewoger72: That's exactly the kind of advice I was hoping for - thanks a million! (And thanks in advance for the masks...!)

  10. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    @gauthierdumonde: I quite like the overlaps too, but it causes a headache for the people in the lab. (I still don't have my own scanner.) Thanks for the likes and advice - I'm gonna try Woger's trick first.

  11. gauthierdumonde
    gauthierdumonde ·

    Woger's trick works if you rehearse a little :). If you need your scans from a lab:; that's trouble. When you have your own scanner yo can decide where you frame it. I already shot a roll today !

  12. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    @gauthierdumonde: Me too - finished off the Mat test roll I started yesterday. Now I'm gonna shoot another Sparklesprocks album. I love holidays...! ;-)

  13. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    @weleasewoger72 and @gauthierdumonde: Well, I tried Woger's technique in my latest album and the results are in: www.lomography.com/homes/buckshot/albums/1905105-keyhole-sp… I swear to God I aligned that sucker to within a micron of a gnat's ass but there's still a very wide gap. I think the problem is that there's probably some slippage before the take-up sprockets engage with the sprocket holes. Will try this technique again because it makes inherent sense, but will tape the film leader to the take-up spool too, to see if that solves it.

  14. weleasewoger72
    weleasewoger72 ·

    This sucks because I still not quite sure how to do personal responses! I forgot to mention I always tape the film to the take up spool. It's so much easier to align that way.

  15. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    @weleasewoger72: Am on it...

  16. jean_louis_pujol
    jean_louis_pujol ·

    @vici ha! Now, everybody know here that you're looking at your photos at your work place ! (a thing that, of course, a french guy like me will never do). ;-) @buckshot : for aligning the first shot without any overlap, when first loading the film, put a mark with a felt pen on the right edge of the first frame (the one that you must shot blind insofar as it had taken the light); at the end of the first serie, rewind gently avoiding the film to go back entirely into the cartridge; then reload the film in the camera, inserting accurately the sprockets so that the first shot will be perfectly aligned on with the mark that you once had made on the first-frame right edge; then shot again your film; then tell me whether or not this works inasmuch as I never tried before.

  17. jean_louis_pujol
    jean_louis_pujol ·

    Anyway, this is a fantastic album and an excellent idea that I will again steal from you! Napoléon - 1 / Nelson - 1

  18. buckshot
    buckshot ·

    @jean_louis_pujol That's exactly what I did in my most recent album here: www.lomography.com/homes/buckshot/albums/1905105-keyhole-sp… But it didn't work. Will tape the film to the take-up spool next time.

  19. mafiosa
    mafiosa ·

    Great album!

  20. japsix
    japsix ·

    beautiful album!

  21. naomac
    naomac ·

    I sometimes shot the first time in a panorama camera sprocket rocket then transfer the film over to me LC-A then no gaps but might be a problem for the lab, you will have to get a scanner.

  22. naomac
    naomac ·

    another great album you are full of ideas.