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Colorsplashing For Dummies

Colorsplashing can do wonders to your image. It can alter the mood of your image, enhance colors, or introduce a totally new perspective! Advanced photography skills are not required here; all it takes is a Colorsplash Camera (or Flash) and your imagination. "Paint" your dog green, dye your friend's face with pink light ... the possibilities are endless! Here's a list of Colorsplashing techniques to try from daytime to nighttime.

Photo by corzh

Long Exposure with Flash (The Colorsplash Brush)

Setting your exposure control to the Long Exposure setting allows you to keep the shutter for just as long as you can press the release button. Aim at your subject and run wild. Streak it from side to side, Z-O-O-M right into their nose, shimmy and shake your lens around their ears. After a few seconds, let go of the button to bathe your subject in a shower of colored flash light. The result – a manic colored and sharp foreground against a blurred, streaked, gorgeous background. Play with exposure times, colors, distance to the subject, and camera movement for endlessly varied results.

Instant Exposure with Flash

Bring the noise. Change your exposure setting to instant shots and hit your subject with a quick, explosive flash burst. Using a color filter will clothe your shot in a deep veil of nearly monochromatic color. Darker colors are stronger, lighter colors let in a wider range of tones. Switch to the colorless filter for a perfectly respectable run-of-the-mill flash shot with white light.

Daytime with Flash

For best results, find yourself a mixed light situation. Like when it’s sunny and bright outside, and your subject is in the shadows. Or, when it’s nasty and overcast and your subject is in a very good mood. Which is always nice. Flip to a color filter to spot-illuminate your subject and ensure that her/him/it stands out against the natural background behind them. Get close; there is a lot of outside light for your flash to overcome in order to look g-o-o-d.

Long Exposure with No Flash

It’s night-time or gettin’ to be around dusk. Aim at something lit up and hold your shutter open with the Long Exposure control. If the sky still has light, give it a second or so. If it’s really dark, then try about 10 seconds. Indoor bars and restaurants take on bright red, yellow, and greenish hues – moving lights dance across your image and people become shadowy blurs. Outdoor lights flood across the horizon and the moonlit sky turns shades of purple. Swing your camera around to create streaked patterns of light. You can even “draw on film” using a strong singular light source!

Daytime Natural

Your Colorsplash is also quite talented at normal daytime snapshots. Throw your eyes at the environment around you and become partners with your contrasty Colorsplash lens – forever on the hunt for intense, vibrant, and odd colors. (Click!) your shutter at the bright yellow delivery van, (Click!) again at the deep blue of the sea around you and the waning red and orange of the tropical sunset. Gorgeous, breathtaking color is all around you – command yourself to seek it out with each shot.

Color Thunderstorm

Take your Colorsplash Camera and a Colorsplash Flash. Notice that both are adorned with attractive, semi-matchingish colors. Choose a subject in the foreground, set your Colorsplash Camera to ‘Long Exposure’ and press the button so that the shutter opens – keeping your finger on the button to keep the shutter open. Then immediately use your other hand to set off the Colorsplash Flash manually, holding it at an angle off to the side so that it flashes directly at your subject in the foreground. By doing that you’ve added a color to your motif. Now you can release the button on the camera, and then it happens: it flashes again, this time with another color and from the front. The result: nobody knows! The tension: mounts ad infinitum!

Photo by renaishashin

written by shhquiet

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