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Taking Back Tipsters: Portrait Photography Tips

Thinking of improving your portrait photography skills? Why not take a look at some of the previously published tipsters by our fellow lomographers and see if they can help you with your portrait work!

So, you finally have an idea about choosing the right lens for portrait work — what’s the next step for you to take better portrait photos? You will need to work on your own composition, angles, backgrounds, and other portraiture techniques and specifics. The featured tipsters by our fellow lomographers in this installment could hopefully help you in that department!

5 Tips on Portrait Photography by jeanmendoza

This tipster could just be the first you’ll need to read to grasp some basic tips for improving your portrait work. Learn about choosing the right background, angle, and expressions to ensure that your subjects stand out and are at their most stunning in your portraits!

Photo by veato

Portrait Photography Tips: The Eyes by veato

“The eyes are said to be the window into a person’s soul. They can draw you in to a portrait and reveal a lot about the person being photographed. For this reason it’s important to ensure the eyes are in focus and sharp,” says lomographer veato and we couldn’t agree more! So, if you think you need some help to make the eyes of your subjects stand out, head over to the article above!

Photo by tomkiddo

Long Exposure Tips For Shooting Portraits With Holga by tomkiddo

You can take impressive portraits with just about any camera, but if you want to take dreamy, mysterious portraits the lo-fi way, you can do it the Holga or Diana F+ way! The tipster above by tomkiddo will help you take long exposure portraits with the Holga or the Diana F+ — or maybe even other cameras that allow you to shoot in Bulb mode!

Photo by rrohe

On Shooting Street Portraits by rrohe

Last but not the least, we have some insight from lomographer rrohe when it comes to taking portraits out in the streets — because portraiture is not limited to the studio or indoor setting typically associated with commercial portraiture. If this is something you haven’t done but want to try, we’re sure you’ll gain some valuable tips on things like getting your subject at ease and whether or not you should ask people if you can take their portraits.

written by plasticpopsicle

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: 中文(繁體版), 中文(繁體版), Deutsch & Italiano.