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Summer Photography Tip: Don't Blow It—Rocket!

Did you know that every time you try to blow a piece of dust off your lens you might, in fact, be gluing that bit of grim to your optics? Rather than using your breath, use an air blaster to remove unwanted debris from your camera's one good eye. What you need is a Rocket!

There’s a small flake of dust on the front element of your lens, what do you do? Well, if you’re like most of us, you attempt to blow it off with a puff of your breath. Hmm, it didn’t even budge off the lens, you’d better try a bigger puff. Still no good; well, you can huff and puff all you want now, you big bad wolf, but that piece of dust isn’t going anywhere. Why? Because it has probably become “glued” to that front element!

Glued by the moisture in your breath? How could that happen? Even the driest “cotton mouth” breath contains water vapor. In fact, several studies suggest that the “typical” water vapor content in an exhaled breath contains about 95% humidity. Remarkably, those same studies reported that approximately 125ml of water vapor could be collected from our breath over a 4 hour period of huffing and puffing. So, that’s a lot of water squirting on your camera’s lens. Right?

Oh, and don’t forget about atmospheric moisture collecting on your lens, too. Particularly during the hot dog days of summer when moving from an air conditioned interior space to a steamy outside venue can cause a thick “fog” to form on your cold lens surface.

So how can you get that darn piece of dust off your lens? Well, you certainly don’t want to blow it off, rather you should Rocket it off, instead. Specifically, the Rocket Air Blaster (Model AA1920) by Giotto. Measuring just 5.3-inches in length, this small, rubber, squeeze bulb “puffer” is able to quickly and easily blow away dust, lint, and crumbs from the front of your camera’s lens.

Just grab the bulb, aim the nozzle, and squeeze your dirty little problem away. Granted, there are a lot of squeeze-bulb air blowers that can do that, but there are several great features that make the Rocket move to the head of the class.

First of all, the air enters the squeeze bulb through a one-way valve that is located on the back of the Rocket. This minimizes the odd chance that the bulb would actually “inhale” the grit that you’re trying to blow off your lens. Secondly, the Rocket has four feet, therefore, it can stand perfectly at your attention on your desk or shelf. But, best of all, the Rocket features two eyelets for accommodating the attachment to either a neck chain or a wrist strap. You’ll be very chic wearing your Rocket Air Blaster around your neck, as well as handling all of life’s little dirty airborne problems.

Costing about the same as two cans of compressed air, the fifteen dollar Rocket will quickly pay for itself after about one month of safe, effortless lint and dust removal. Plus, how many squeeze-bulb blowers do you know that have a serial number? The Rocket has one and its red nozzle virtually screams Christian Louboutin

So I highly recommend you stop blowing it and instead Rocket away the detritus of life that could ruin your next great shot.

Giotto’s AA1920 Rocket Air Blaster Small-Black
$14.99

  • Made of rubber
  • One-way air entry valve at back
  • Two eyelets for accommodating a neck chain or strap
  • Four feet for upright storage on desktop
  • 5.3-inches long
  • 2-inch long removable red nozzle
  • Serial Number

written by themindseye

3 comments

  1. neanderthalis

    neanderthalis

    I have something similar and it is my comrade in arms against dust around my equipment.

    10 months ago · report as spam
  2. guanatos

    guanatos

    so do I, reeaaaallly helpful :)

    10 months ago · report as spam
  3. bsdunek

    bsdunek

    Keep one of those in my darkroom and my camera bag. Very handy, especially outdoors.

    10 months ago · report as spam

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Italiano.