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How to Scan your 110 Film

In December I was given two 110 films (an Orca B/W and a Color Tiger) at my usual lab. My main concern was not which camera I had to use to shoot them, because when all this 110 comeback started I managed to get a very well preserved Agfamatic in a second-hand market. What really messed with my head was how would I scan such a small film. Finally it wasn't that difficult and now I share my experience...

To scan your 110 film you will need the following:

1. A scanner with scanning masks (I use the Epson V500)
2. Scissors
3. Electrical tape (something that every lomographer should have)
4. An exposed film

I think I didn’t forget anything, but in order to summarize, some graphic help:

The first thing to take into account is that, when developing, tell them not to cut the film (you will eventually do it patiently) so that you can control what you want to scan.

I decided to use the 120 scanning mask of my Epson V500. Why? When cutting film you will realize that it tends to curl and you will have to fix that in order to get the process properly done. (NOTE: in the case of the 120 Epson scanning mask, you need 5 frames per cut).

Is the film curling? Don’t worry, that’s what the electrical tape is for. Cut a couple of small pieces and place them carefully on each end. Then attach one end to the scanning mask carefully but firmly, and when attaching the other end you have to put pressure on the film so it straightens as much as possible:

After doing this, this is what the scanning mask should look like:

If you have followed all these steps and your results look like the ones of my photo… you are ready to scan!

As an additional note, I’m going to tell you what happened to the end of my film. Because of the handling and because each film has only 24 frames, it’s possible that the last piece of film is not long enough to scan be scanned this way. IT DOESN’T MATTER… Take some more tape and attach any piece of film that has no photos from the beginning (where usually there are none) in order to make the film long enough for the scanning mask:

Now that you know this, you only have to enjoy scanning your 110 films!!!

written by jet and translated by lintrs

2 comments

  1. stonerfairy

    stonerfairy

    This is good saving!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. xgitte

    xgitte

    great tip!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam

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The original version of this article is written in: Spanish. It is also available in: 日本語, Deutsch & Československy.