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Don't Think, Just Overexpose Your Film

Don't worry about overexposing your film. Redscale it and shoot pinhole

I was curious about getting my own pinhole camera. As I’m googling it and I’ve found a website that shows tutorial to make my own pinhole camera by using cardboard. I’ve spend couple of hours in making it. After I’ve done it, I tried shooting with it. But when I want to roll it back , it stuck and I accidentally tear the film.

So I have decided to modify my Russian FED 5 to become a PinFED. I managed to modify it and this is the looks of that camera:

I had to throw away the Industar 61L/D lens but not actually throwing it away into the dustbin. I’m just keeping it for a while because I’m using my own pinhole lens. The pinhole lens I made it up by using a piece from a drink can and piece of cardboard from film box. After making it, I just taped it to the camera. Make sure the inside and outside are colored black so reflective light would not disturb your exposure. Also make sure there is no leaking of light from the outside. Then redscale your film. I bet mostly of you know how to redscale film. Set the aperture of your pinhole by using this formula; Aperture(f-stop) = Focal length / size of pinhole (mm) for FED 5, measure the film plane to the pinhole lens. then you will get the new focal length.

Mine was f 25 and I set the iso of 50 so that it will become less saturated because I don’t like it. Ha ha. Using light meter to meter your EV because you already know the iso and the Aperture or if you are using SLR, use aperture priority mode. Mine got its own light meter. Mostly of my shots, I’m expose it approximately 2 seconds at Sunny day. These are the results:

Voila. You don’t have to worry about overexposing your film because it’s redscale. It’s all about overexposing it when using redscale film. Try it !!

written by caribe93

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