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Playing With Colors: Get Contrasting Colors From Negative Films!

Lomography is about colors, isn't it? We all love photos with high contrasting colors like popping red, blue, yellow, green, and etc. Then, most of us think that to get this kind of photos, we need xpro (cross process) to achieve it. I thought so too at the beginning when i just started lomography. But today I am going to show you guys how to get high contrasting photos with negative films instead of slide films!

Before I found out this method, I thought that shooting with negative films give you just this kind of photo.

You will need:

  • Your camera
  • Negative Film
  • Sun
  • Blue Sky

The method is very simple! Load your films (preferably ISO 100 or ISO 200) into your camera and shoot it during a sunny day when the sky is BLUE! Remember to set your ISO to ISO 50 for an ISO 100 film and ISO 100 for an ISO 200 film before you shoot. The purpose of setting the ISO in this manner is to prevent having back-lit photos.

Yes, it’s so simple, just shoot it on a super sunny day with blue sky. Personally, I think having blues in your photos just make your lomographs look lovely! By doing so, even a normal negative film can give you high contrasting colours in your photos! Try this method out with slide films too as this will give you even stronger contrast!

written by bao_wei

6 comments

  1. robotmonkey1996

    robotmonkey1996

    So... basically overexpose it by 1 stop?

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. bao_wei

    bao_wei

    Yes by 1 stop.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. jokelangens

    jokelangens

    I only have toy cameras, but in this case, when it's sunny, you set your camera at 'cloudy'? I'm sorry if this is a stupid question, I get always confused by this contrary thinking with ISO.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  4. bao_wei

    bao_wei

    Yes u can try using cloudy.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  5. jokelangens

    jokelangens

    thank you!

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  6. adash

    adash

    Awesome! Most people forget how juicier things get when light has been used properly! Cool tipster.

    almost 2 years ago · report as spam

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