Petzval_preorder_header_kit

Now Available for Pre-Order - First Come, First Served

Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

How to Survive the Gray Wintertime

Now that it's winter time, you will also have the problem, that you need higher ISO films which are more difficult to find. Here is a little guide about all the possibilities for taking most out of the winter!

For example when you use the Diana F+: she is made for 400 ISO films, and when using ISO 200 or 100, it is only possible to shoot on sunny days. During the wintertime, even a higher ISO like 800 would be good.

Photo by shoujoai

Also when using the LC-A+, a 100 ISO film is not always enough in the dark wintertime, because many pictures get blurry.

Of course, there are 800 ISO films, but my main problem is, that I am not a big fan of “normal” negative films. I always like different and strange colors on my pictures, like they show up with x-pro or redscale. To be honest, I am an “x-pro junkie” and nearly never develop films as they normally should be. And when it’s as gray outside as in German winter, that’s even one more reason to make it more colorful. But high-iso slide films are very limited, and if one could found them, they are often very expensive. So what to do?

After thinking a while about this and discussing with others, I found a lot of possibilities which I did not even try all!

1. My standard film: Fuji Provia 400X

Nothing to complain about this nice slide film, which is perfect in the Diana. Also, it is not too expensive. Search in the film reviews to get more details about it, for example here (in german). Some pictures I took with the Provia 400X :

2. Use black & white film!

Black and white film is perfect to trick even the worst weather. B&W films always yield great pictures, as long as there is enough contrast in them. The big advantage is, that they have an ISO range up to 3200, and even the high ISO films are easy to find. For example the Ilford Delta 3200, which is one of my favorite films. Here is a film review (in German) and some shots I took:

3. Push, push and push!

Pushing is the best method to get the maximum out of a film! I already tried some 100 ISO films in my Diana F+ and just pushed them two steps. Also other Lomographers like pulex experimented with this possibility, here for example for Velvia 100+2, Astia 100+2, Kodak E100S +2, Sensia 100 +2, Agfa CT Precisa 100 +2, Sensia 200, Kodak E200

If you want to be sure about the results, it is always a good idea to browse on Lomography.com for some pushed shots of a special film. But you should also try it when you don’t find anything! Every film has its borders, but they should be discovered.

4. Crossing Negative film

The good news: also negative films can be crossed! The bad news: they lose one or two steps of their ISO. But they can be pushed again. You should try it with an ISO 800 negative film, treating like a 400 ISO and then crossing it in E6. Sometimes the pictures can get darker, and when you don’t like this, you should push the film. Beware, that pictures developed in E6 are not as forgivable for exposure failures as C41’s, which allow an after-over- and underexposed while scanning.

5. Redscaling high-ISO negative films

When we search for films in special colors, we shouldn’t forget Redscales for adding some warm color to cold days. But also for redscaling films it is important to know: the film looses one or two steps of the ISO.
The results are sometimes different depending on the exposure, as we know it from the Lomography Redscale XR. For redscaling 120 film, the easiest way is to take a 220 film, turn it around and close the window for the counter.

Now the winter can come! We are looking forward to experiment a lot. And for those who are also happy with "normal“ negative films, the best thing is to take the Lomography CN 800 or another one with high ISO!

Who says film is dead? Lomography’s got its very own emulsions to keep the fire burning! Visit the Shop and see which Lomography film is right for you.

written by shoujoai and translated by shoujoai

3 comments

  1. gvelasco

    gvelasco

    Great article. Nice work.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. djramsay

    djramsay

    Really great

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. superlighter

    superlighter

    great pictures!

    about 2 years ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

The original version of this article is written in: Deutsch.