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Panoramic Photos but Without A Panoramic Camera

You heard me. Trying different exposures, got me thinking what else I can do with my camera. That’s when I found out about panoramic photos and how I can achieve such effect. This method has been around for a while and many professional photographers have been using and talking about it.

Make a series of photographs in a row with the intention of printing them as a multi-panel panorama. You may or may not use a tripod for this, but take note that your results will be very different depending on your choice. Be sure to keep your exposure the same throughout each series of images that you intend to print together.

Here are the sample photos:

All you need (is love):
• Any camera
• Tripod
• Inspiration and time

The setup is very easy and using a tripod is just a suggestion. Use the same exposure times and settings for all of your pictures and, if you’re using a tripod, be sure to capture all the details of your subject in order to make a proper panorama (or not, think like a lomographer). What I did was, I marked the spot with a chalk underneath my tripod.

Start from the left to the right.

If your camera is a Holga or a Diana, you can manually wind the film so you can get a single panoramic frame. From the left to the right, shoot the first frame, turn to the left, wind the film, and don’t use the reading from the rear window, count the number of clicks in order to get 18-20 clicks, and so on. (This is important!)

After scanning the film, you can merge the photos using Photoshop or whatever software you work with. OR you can just leave it like that. You can merge as many frames as you want.

Have fun with this one!

written by pvalyk

4 comments

  1. radiogramma

    radiogramma

    Brilliant tip, thank you :)

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. emperornorton

    emperornorton

    One note: sometimes as you shift your aim about, the light might change and alter your photo. Thus you might have a portion that is embarassingly lighter or darker than the other panels.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. pvalyk

    pvalyk

    Well, this might be, but think about the Spinner 360 camera. You dont have to change the exposure time in order to get even light in your panorama, and also, the photos you get with this camera are really nice.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  4. pvalyk

    pvalyk

    over 2 years ago · report as spam

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