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If you know about masks and you know about multiple exposures, then why not try combining these two techniques to come up with a new and exciting type of image that will inspire you to try more new and exciting techniques and images.

Me and my boyfriend decided to try something new with masking other than the usual placing of one behind the lens, after a bit of working it out in our heads (me taking a little longer then him to understand) multiple masking was born! This is a technique that everyone can use on any of their camera’s.

What you will need:

  • Two masks for your camera (a positive and a negative one)
  • Some selotape
  • A sense of adventure (recommended)

What you need to do:

  • Decide on what kind of shape or look you want for your images (in this case the johannesburg skyline)
  • Then decide what part of the image you would like to shoot first (in this case it was the city or the sky a.k.a the top or the bottom), the black area will remain unexposed and the clear area will be exposed
  • Place and selotape the first mask upside down inside of your camera and start shooting, bear in mind the area of film you are shooting, in some of these examples we did underwater shots for the sky half to get the blue tones for an abstract sky.
  • Once you have shot the entire roll with the first mask rewind it leaving a little film unwound to allow you to reshoot the roll.
  • Place and selotape the opposite mask also upside down, this time exposing the part of the film you left unexposed last time and ‘hiding’ the exposed part.
  • Reshoot the roll, once again bearing in mind the area you are shooting
  • Once you have finished the roll, rewind it all the way and take it to be developed

We had a bit of overlap as we did not set our masks to line up completely right. This allowed us to scan our images and view them in long strips or cut them into individual shots both looking equally good and giving a different feel. The options are endless for the type of image you are wanting to create so go get experimenting – lets see what you come up with!

written by nicx

2 comments

  1. dearjme

    dearjme

    Wow, those intricate masks don't seem to allow crisp divisions between the upper and bottom exposures, but the results look cool!

    about 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. domo-guy

    domo-guy

    Confusing... But i get it. Nice idea! :)

    about 3 years ago · report as spam