Lomoinstant_en
Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

MINI Camera, Maxi View

I did some tests to compare the Diana MINI field of view to the field of view of some other well known cameras. I also tested how much of a difference focus really makes with the Diana MINI.

I shot some pictures from the exact same location using first the Diana F+ with the standard 75mm lens, then the Diana MINI, then the Diana F+ with the 38mm Super Wide-Angle lens, respectively. These are the results. Ignore the differences in exposure. I was using slide film in the MINI. I also didn’t fix any of the composition by rotating or cropping, so that I could make a good comparison of the field of view

You can clearly see from these pictures that even with a much smaller frame size than the Diana+, the Diana MINI has a larger field of view than the Diana+ with the standard lens. You can also see that it vignettes strongly and naturally and that it has similar distortions to the Diana+.

You can also see how nicely the Super Wide-Angle lens works with the Diana+.

The MINI has a 24mm lens which is extremely wide-angle for a half-frame camera. The only half-frames of which I know with a wider angle lens are the Golden Half which has a 22mm lens and the Pen F for which there was an available 22mm lens.

I’ve done a lot of comparisons with my other 35mm cameras now and it looks like the 35mm equivalents are as advertised. That is, 30mm equivalent in square format and 35mm equivalent in half-frame format. I took these pictures using the Diana MINI and the LOMO LC-A+ from exactly the same spot.

The LC-A+ has a 32mm lens. It is a little hard to compare because you’re comparing a square format against a rectangular format, but you can see the that MINI is pretty close to the same from side to side and includes even more from top to bottom.

The focus on the my MINI is very soft. I’ve done extensive focusing tests and you can hardly tell the difference when you adjust the focus. This is partially because of the smallish aperture, partly because of the wide angle, and partly because the focus is soft at best.

This is an animation of different shots of the same scene where the focus changes from closest to farthest and back again:

You can see it makes a difference with the closest objects, but not much.

Here’s another one doing the same thing:

Again, you can see the closest stuff going in and out of focus, but everything else isn’t affected too much. Moral of the story? Go ahead and focus, but don’t sweat it if you forget. Often, I leave the focus on my MINI right in the middle and just treat it like a fixed-focus point and shoot.

written by gvelasco

11 comments

  1. superlighter

    superlighter

    cool!

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  2. metzgor

    metzgor

    nice animations!

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  3. coldkennels

    coldkennels

    I've started to wonder whether the "soft focus" aspect is more to do with a slow shutter speed; my shots taken with the Diana Mini combined with a flash or a tripod are much, much sharper than anything I've ever shot hand-held. It probably doesn't help that the shutter jolts the camera so much, and it's too light to really hold steady. What do you reckon, gvelasco?

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  4. zoloto

    zoloto

    !!)

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  5. mikahsupageek

    mikahsupageek

    great tipster and animations !

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  6. wuxiong

    wuxiong

    Very practical comparison. Useful to all Diana lovers. Yes, I agree with coldkennels that the mini shutter is quite hard to press and need "big force". I even Saw once some one broke the shutter lever when press. Plus the mini speed is 1/60. That may be part of the reason of blurring. Whatever, we still in love with this little baby. <:)

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  7. stickyvinny

    stickyvinny

    Great tipster!

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  8. tallyho

    tallyho

    Really useful! I agree that it's partly a slow shutter speed that gives the soft focus. I feel like that's one of the main differences when people try to do Diana v. Holga comparisons too.

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  9. realmustache

    realmustache

    great tipster. the animations are really useful in illustrating your points. well played

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  10. gvelasco

    gvelasco

    I think the shutter speed does have something to do with the general "softness" of this camera, but these tests were done with the camera on the ground, using a shutter release cable.

    I also agree that it's an important distinction between the Dianas (Plus and MINI) and the Holgas (120 and 135s) that they have different shutter speeds. A slower shutter and bigger aperture makes the Dianas much better in low light.

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  11. inksi

    inksi

    Usefull tipster! The comparisons are very good.

    about 4 years ago · report as spam