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Patience Is Virtue

There is nothing more exciting than getting a package containing a brand new lomo camera, awaiting to explore the world in your hands. So here's a few tips before snapping away.

I find that the excitement of getting a brand new package can be very overwhelming, but it can also lead to frustration, wasting film, or maybe even breaking the camera. So over the few months I’ve been getting new cameras and testing them here’s what I’ve learned:

  • ALWAYS read the instructions booklet FULLY before going out to shoot with your camera. Sometimes the instruction booklet might be missing a few problems you’re stumbling across, so before forcing anything into place [or out of place] search the LSI tipster, or any other informational page on analog troubles, because it is most probable that you’re not the first one to encounter this issue.
  • For the first roll of film you pop into your new baby, use a film that is not too important for you, because chances are that these first pictures won’t come out exactly as you think they will.
  • Try to get the first test roll developed before popping more film into the camera. That way you have an idea of where you missed and what things you can improve, or also if you’re putting the film in correctly, so that you don’t end up shooting three rolls of what you think will be amazing pictures, and then when you get them back from the lab, you find they’re completely blank.
  • Most labs around where I live do one hour photo processing. Sometimes they’ll ‘pass’ lomographs just because they’re double exposed, or have some weird experiment you were trying out that is completely alien to them. For that reason, I always stick around during the process of developing and scanning, to make sure that they will print or scan the entire roll. It always helps if you’re friendly, specially if it’s a lab you’ll be visiting frequently. This will come in handy when it’s time to cross process.

So that pretty much sums up my set of newbie tips. Here’s a gallery of my first roll failures so you don’t feel too bad when your first pictures don’t come out exactly as you expected them.

written by reneg88

6 comments

  1. wuxiong

    wuxiong

    Quite useful tips especially for green hands in Lomography. Actually, I like all attached fotos, the last one the best. hahaaa

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  2. kvboyle

    kvboyle

    I wish I had more failures like no 3! Good advice for all - I will remember when I go out later for the first roll with my spinner!!!!!!

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  3. shoujoai

    shoujoai

    haha, 7 is so funny :D

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  4. panelomo

    panelomo

    your first roll's waaay better than mine :)

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  5. nylonviolence

    nylonviolence

    the last photo is genius! :D

    about 4 years ago · report as spam
  6. nfocusdesign

    I like number 7. If you stare at it for a short time, the faces change. I think I even saw Santa :)
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