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Tipster of the Week: Seamlessly Extending Your View

If you enjoyed the recent "Endless Wall" feature we have at our website and left you clicking for more, then here's something to quench your addiction of seeing continuous photos! Because this time, our very generous Tipster will be sharing his method on achieving such effect!

Smoother Holga and LC-A Partial-winding Panoramas by luobodingr

Build this simple mask into your camera to help blur the edges of multiple images that will remove the unsightly frame breaks and flow into each other more smoothly!

I have always enjoyed double exposures and similarly enjoy partial winding to make holga-ramas or panoramas with my Lomo L-CA and the Holga. I was often frustrated though by the harsh and clear lines that are formed on each image at the edge of each frame. I determined to try a way of blurring those edges such that a smoother transition could be achieved in overlapping images.

What you have to do is get inside the camera, between the film and the lens, in such a way that you let the light “spill” onto the left and right of the are of film to be exposed. Yes, this does reduce the size of the area exposed, but that is fine for partial winding anyway. You can see from the pics that it can be done fairly easily by cutting off little strips of black cardboard and sticking them inside with blu-tac. Pictured is what I did with the Holga but I have also now done it with the Lomo LC-A+ and it works just the same.

If you want to see exactly how much of the image you are chopping off or losing to the spilled light on the edges, stick some tracing paper over the other end of the mask where the film should go and hold it up to a light, you’ll see how much of the negative are is lost and how well the light is “spilled” Check out the images. See how the images in the other two smoothly overlap and intertwine with each other.

You have to remember when shooting that the exposure is smaller than normal and also remember to tell them NOT to cut the negativess when you put it in for development. A big part of the fun in this is finding the areas in a roll where the images have best merged!

Actually, the images in the Holga image are not as overlapped as they could have been, they sort of lie next to each other, but the Lomo LC-A ones certainly are. Despite this, what I am most pleased with is that they flow into each other really smoothly. Redness there due to X-pro Fuji Velvia by the way.

If it’s not clear yet, ask your questions here – I’ll endeavour to get back and answer them!

written by luobodingr

3 comments

  1. eggzakly

    eggzakly

    I guess you could use little strips of ND gel filter instead of cardboard to make the transition smoother?

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  2. stouf

    stouf

    Super ! Another way to make the transition smoother with the Holga could be to put your mask outside, in front of the lens @http://www.lomograph(…)ediscovered

    almost 5 years ago · report as spam
  3. luobodingr

    luobodingr

    @eggzactly, I would assume so and the effect could be quite brilliant.
    @stouf, the first time I did this it was in front of the lens and yes, it works a charm. The problem is that it wants to stay put when you rotate the focus dial and you get skewed results.
    @LSI: thanks so much for posting this. I thought it had long gone into the depths of the deepest vaults!

    almost 5 years ago · report as spam