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Your search "library" resulted in 264 Articles

  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 79: Auto Focus Cameras Flood the Market

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 79: Auto Focus Cameras Flood the Market
    The Ronica CF35 AF hit the market in 1977 and was the first mass-marketed camera that featured sensors that automatically adjusted to the correct focus. Thus autofocus was invented. This function, which made photography a lot easier (but also a bit more restricted) and pushed the concept of `point and shoot' cameras to new levels, quickly gained large popularity amongst the public.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 77: The Rollei 35 Swings the 60s

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 77: The Rollei 35 Swings the 60s
    Even though the Rollel 35 was so small, it featured sophisticated high-end functions including fully manual aperture and shutter speed settings, a collapsible and excellent 40mm F3.5 Tessar lens, and a light-meter making it an ultra-compact camera that promised everything you could wish for.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 76: Kodak Instamatics

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 76: Kodak Instamatics
    Between 1963 and 1970, an incredible 50 million cameras were produced. Certainly, many competitors released similar or more advanced versions (Canon, Olympus, Minolta, Rollei and Ricoh). However, it was still good-old Kodak who once again dominated the market for easy and inexpensive photography with simple and compact cameras during this era.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 73: As Compact as an SLR Can Be: the Olympus Pen

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 73: As Compact as an SLR Can Be: the Olympus Pen
    The Olympus Pen series used several tricks to avoid this problem. By using a complex series of internal prisms rather than a pentaprism and a half-frame format (meaning that you could take up to 72 shots on a roll of 35mm film) that also allowed the use of smaller lenses, the Pen was one of the smallest SLR-cameras ever and stands at the beginning of the success story of Olympus as a manufacturer of small innovative cameras.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 71: Worldwide Development

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 71: Worldwide Development
    As the Germans were trying to top each other with annual new inventions in the 1930s, foreign markets kicked into gear. So it was in 1930, our friends at LOMO PLC in Russia were producing their first camera, the FOTOKOR. But this camera was still quite a big hunk of metal and couldn't be considered a compact camera.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 69: A Warm Welcome to the Leica

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 69: A Warm Welcome to the Leica
    Kodak well and truly announced its active presence on the German market. The Brownie had immense success there before US products disappeared from Germany during the First World War. During this time, German producers decided to develop and promote their own products and seriously combat the models from overseas.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 67: The Kodak No. 1

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 67: The Kodak No. 1
    The first compact Kodak camera is considered to be the Kodak No. 1 of 1888, which used roll film. At first this film was still based on paper, but with later Kodak models was replaced by the use of a celluloid base. Consisting mainly of a rectangular wooden box, the No. I didn't have a viewfinder and therefore necessarily required "shooting from the hip" a technique well known and promoted by we Lomographers nowadays.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 66: Early Years of Photography

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 66: Early Years of Photography
    The first steps towards everyday life snap-shot photography were taken when Kodak, a young optical company from Rochester, New York in the USA, introduced the first flexible negatives coated on paper in 1884. Thus presenting an alternative to the fragile and inconvenient glass plates that had previously been used.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 62: Interview with LOMO PLC General Director Aleksandr Mikhailovich Aronov

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 62: Interview with LOMO PLC General Director Aleksandr Mikhailovich Aronov
    Aleksandr Mikhailovich Aronov has been with LOMO PLC for more than 30 years. He has worked for the company as a manager and an expert in financial affairs before being elected as Chairman of the board of Directors. He is now the Director General of LOMO PLC, has written two doctoral thesis and when he finds the time, he likes collecting books.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 60: Back to the Roots: Military Production and Expansion

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 60: Back to the Roots: Military Production and Expansion
    It was not easy for LOMO PLC to enter the free market. Previously its products had always been in demand as there were no alternatives on the market. No marketing was ever needed due to the precise planning of the Five Year Plans. The Ministry of Defence and Industry even had a waiting list for LOMO PLC’s products as demand always exceeded supply. Now these days were over.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 56: The LOMO Kompakt Automat

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 56: The LOMO Kompakt Automat
    As the young LOMO LC-A’s hit the shops and supermarkets, the production of the little camera was constantly increasing and the building of the “Filiale”, a 100,000 squaremetre extra-building for LOMO LC-A production purposes, was finished in 1985/1986.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 54: Lubitel 166, 166B and Universal

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 54: Lubitel 166, 166B and Universal
    In 1976 and 1980, the Lubitel 166 and Lubitel 166 B were introduced to the market. The 166 was basically the successor of the long-serving Lubitel 2 and featured a more light-weight thermoplastic body and an automatic shutter cock.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 53: Eight Shots in a Row: LOMO 135 BC and LOMO 135 M

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 53: Eight Shots in a Row: LOMO 135 BC and LOMO 135 M
    In 1975, the LOMO 135 BC and some years later the LOMO 135 M saw the light of the day. They were the improved, cheaper and mass-produced successors of the famous “Leningrad” camera. The Leningrad had two drawbacks: firstly, it was not ready for automatic film development, as it left no space between the frames, and secondly its spring was often too strong so that it disrupted the film when winding on.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 49: The Leningrad: Award Winning Rangefinder Camera

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 49: The Leningrad: Award Winning Rangefinder Camera
    The “Leningrad” (that was actually developed by German war prisoners in St Petersburg) first rolled off the GOMZ belts in 1956 and was the most professional and expensive camera ever produced by the works. Besides its premium optics, a typical feature of all-things GOMZ, it bore a robust silver-top case and had all the attributes that made it a professional range-finder camera: a coupled range-finder, focal-plane and interchangeable lenses.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 48: Komsomolets and Lubitel: Medium Format Twin-Lens Reflex Cameras

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 48: Komsomolets and Lubitel: Medium Format Twin-Lens Reflex Cameras
    In the prosperous years of the post-war era, another camera fought its corner, right up to the late 1980's. The "Komsomolets", which means " Young Communist", saw the light of the overcast St Petersburg's day in 1946 and was an easy-to-handle twin-lens reflex camera. The Germans provided, whether they wanted to or not, the 1938 Voigtlander "Brilliant" an exact model for the robust Amateur-cam.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 47: The Smena: A Camera for Everyone

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 47: The Smena: A Camera for Everyone
    The Smena, which roughly translated means "Young Generation", was the one camera that was clearly designed for mass production, and has bravely accompanied millions of photographers throughout their lives.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 46: War and Post-War Years

    LC-A  Big Book Chapter 46: War and Post-War Years
    From September 1941 until January 1944 St Petersburg was besieged by German troops. Hardly anyone or anything could get in or out of the city for around 900 days. lt was one of the harshest times in history for the people of St Petersburg. Food supplies could only be transported under great danger by plane or trucks, which took the route over the frosted Ladoga Lake. The situation became dramatic in 1941, as winter fell unusually early and temperatures dropped to -40° Celsius. ln December 1941 approximately 53,000 people died as a result of starvation and cold.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 45: The Bloom of Photo Camera Production

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 45: The Bloom of Photo Camera Production
    Nevertheless, no honest communist wanted to miss the opportunity to document his surroundings with a big camera in his hands and so the number of amateur photographers in the 1930's was quite large. These photographers were mostly developing their images themselves in their own home bathroom laboratory, as public services that offered photographic treatment such as development and printing simply did not exist.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 40: LOMO PLC: An Exceptional Russian Optical Factory

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 40: LOMO PLC: An Exceptional Russian Optical Factory
    Come on! Let's dive into it and get to know the extraordinary history of the LOMO LC A’s inventors, the LOMO PLC optical works, St Petersburg.
  • LC-A Big Book Chapter 39: LOMO LCA+ Forever

    LC-A Big Book Chapter 39: LOMO LCA+ Forever
    In a record breaking six months after the signing of the contract and the engineering start date in April 2006 the first new LOMO LC-A+ lay in the hands of the Chinese engineer – and it worked! However only to begin with only. Further prototypes of the camera were then manufactured and sent to Vienna.