Community_cup_july_2014
0 : 5

Monday 12:00 CET to Tuesday 12:00 CET – Build 5 LomoWalls which represent your love for analogue – Reward: 5 Piggies

0 : 1

Tuesday 12:00 CET to Wednesday 12:00 CET – Write a blog entry about why you love analogue photography – Reward: 5 Piggies

0 : 50

Wednesday 12:00 CET to Thursday 12:00 CET – Upload 50 Photos - Reward: 5 Piggies

0 : 1

Thursday 12:00 CET to Sunday 21:00 CET – Who do you think will win the huge climax to the football fiesta in Brazil? Take a lucky strike and make your guess in our magazine article - Reward: 10 Piggies

Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Your search "#magicofcinema" resulted in 5 Articles

  • The Magic of Early Cinema – The Serpentine Dance

    The Magic of Early Cinema – The Serpentine Dance
    Today we’re looking at ‘The Serpentine Dance’, a wonderful short film produced by the Lumière brothers at the end of the 19th century – In the movie, we watch the dancer Loie Fuller as she moves gracefully around in a gown which constantly changes color – The film was shot in black and white and each frame was hand painted afterwards to give this beautiful effect. It truly is a masterpiece of early cinema...
  • The Magic of Early Cinema – Un Homme de Têtes (1898)

    The Magic of Early Cinema – Un Homme de Têtes (1898)
    ‘Un Homme de Têtes’ (also known as ‘The Four Troublesome Heads’ or ‘Four heads are better than one’) is film directed by and starring perhaps the greatest experimenter of early cinema, Georges Méliès. In this ingenious little film, Méliès removes his head (multiple times) and plays a banjo – It’s really all in a day’s work for a true conjurer of cinematic magic!
  • The Magic of Early Cinema – The Skeleton of Joy (1897)

    The Magic of Early Cinema – The Skeleton of Joy (1897)
    In our 3rd installment of our ‘Magic of early cinema’ series, we take a look at ‘The Skeleton of Joy’, an 1897 film by the Lumière brothers. Sure, we may be used to seeing ghouls and monsters in our movies nowadays, but just imagine how it must have been to be an audience member at the end of the 19th century!
  • The Magic of Early Cinema – The Vanishing Lady (1896)

    The Magic of Early Cinema – The Vanishing Lady (1896)
    In our second installment of our ‘Magic of Early Cinema’ series, we take a look at ‘The Vanishing Lady’ (or ‘Escamotage d’une dame chez Robert-Houdin’ as it was originally titled) – The short film was produced by Georges Méliès, a director who continually pushed the experimental boundaries of cinema. Read on and watch a true magician at work!
  • The Magic of Early Cinema – The Execution of Mary Stuart (1895)

    The Magic of Early Cinema – The Execution of Mary Stuart (1895)
    The first days of cinema were truly exciting times – Inventors and Directors experimented with the possibilities of film and took them in some amazing directions – In this series of articles, we’ll be showing you some of the most ingenious early cinematic shorts – We can’t wait to see LomoKino movies inspired by these! First up is ‘The Execution of Mary Stuart’, a very clever movie produced by one of the pioneers of cinema, Thomas Edison.