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  • Agfa RSX (120, 50 iso) user-review

    Agfa RSX (120, 50 iso) user-review
    Not to be confused with the successor RSX II but since this was discontinued years ago, it may be a little hard to find now and with some luck you may find a few if you're patient enough! The best place to start hunting for this is probably from eBay.
  • Kodak 160vc (120, 160 iso) user-review

    Kodak 160vc (120, 160 iso) user-review
    This film is sometimes hazy, brilliant, greenish, vivid... not only are the colours completely unpredictable, but this is also a bit of a villain kind of film.
  • Kiev 88 - The Beast from the East

    Kiev 88 - The Beast from the East
    Built like a tank (and weighing almost as much), the Kiev 88 takes amazing pictures! Compared to other medium format cameras of it's class, it's inexpensive and yields crisp, clear pictures, much like the camera it was modeled after--the Hassleblad.
  • Kodak bw400CN (35mm, 400 iso) user-review

    Kodak bw400CN (35mm, 400 iso) user-review
    Honestly I have to say, I became a fan of this film by incident. First of all I was not really a big fan of Black/White before - I always liked the shots that I saw on magazines but mine never really turned out that nice.
  • Samsung Prime Color (35mm, 100 iso) user-review

    Samsung Prime Color (35mm, 100 iso) user-review
    Lovely negative! A cheap film and can be found easily!
  • Ihagee Exa 1a, A Magic "DDR" Camera

    Ihagee Exa 1a, A Magic
    The former "DDR" or "GDR" (German Democratic Republic, that means East Germany from 1949 to 1990) had a very important camera industry and produced some really great cameras; One of those is the Ihagee Exa 1a, a beautiful bulky SLR with top viewfinder. Let me introduce this little gem! :)
  • Fuji Velvia (35mm, 100 iso) user-review

    Fuji Velvia (35mm, 100 iso) user-review
    Disliked by some photographers but adored by Lomographers
  • Nikon FM2

    Nikon FM2
    Half a kilogram heavy metal toy.
  • Rollei Retro (120, 400 iso) user-review

    Rollei Retro (120, 400 iso) user-review
    The ONLY film worth using during classic tweed cycling events: I went on a quick hunt for flat caps and tweed jackets and realised that my old Yashica Twin Lens would really fit the Look! and what better film to use than the Rollei Retro 400!
  • Mefag Handy-Box

    Mefag Handy-Box
    Imagine the soft focus of the Diana, the magic touch of the Holga and the awesome sharpness of the Lubitel (creds to Vicuna)... The Mefag Handy-Box is capable of producing astonishingly beautiful, dreamy yet sharp, captures of our world!
  • AGAT 18K Small But Powerful!!

    AGAT 18K  Small But Powerful!!
    One day accidentally I met my old friend. We haven’t seen each other for a long time, so we spoke for a while about how we are doing and so on. I told him about my new sickness LOMOGRAPHY, Cameras and films. My friend remembered that somewhere at home he has old weird Russian camera. Next day he brought to me that little plastic box and gave me like a present.
  • Kodak Ektachrome Lumiere (35mm, 100 iso) user-review

    Kodak Ektachrome Lumiere (35mm, 100 iso) user-review
    No wonder it's rare!
  • Kodak Ektar (35mm, 100 iso) user-review

    Kodak Ektar (35mm, 100 iso) user-review
    Is it real? That such great colours made by an ordinary negative film? This film is extraordinary!!!
  • Fuji Provia (120, 400 iso) user-review

    Fuji Provia (120, 400 iso) user-review
    Like a instant image: Lately, instant photography is getting rare and at certain places, the possibility of having a film for it requires some skillful hunting. Surprisingly, this one can be your quick fix...
  • WOCA 120G

    WOCA 120G
    The WOCA 120G is a discontinued glass lens Holga. It is similar to the Holga 120S in every way except that it has a very inexpensive glass lens. In theory the glass lens should make the images slightly sharper, at least in the middle. Like the original Holga 120S, the WOCA has only one shutter speed, (approximately 1/100th) and only one f/stop at roughly f/8. It uses 120 film and can be adapted, like any other Holga, to shoot 35mm film. Some Holga enthusists shudder (or is that shutter?) at the idea of a glass lens. Yet, at the same time, it is closer to original Holga than the current 120N model, or any of its variants.
  • Canon Canonet QL17

    Canon Canonet QL17
    Often described (as many other cameras are) as the "poor man's Leica", the Canon Canonet QL17 is a brilliant rangefinder at a fraction of the cost of most other rangefinders. It sports a crystal clear, tack sharp, f1.7 45mm lens that accurately captures colors as well as all the gradients between black and white. Produced in the mid-1960s and sturdily built, many excellent examples of this camera and later versions can be found on ebay for a steal. Due to age, the light seals need to replaced but this can be done by most camera enthusiasts with a sheet of black foamy, x-acto knife, and some adhesive. There are several website that offer instructions on how to replace the seals simply by plugging Canonet QL17 into a search engine.
  • Foma Fortepan (35mm, 100 iso) user-review

    Foma Fortepan (35mm, 100 iso) user-review
    Such a cool and affordable B/W film available in the market. Has an odd grain and smooth tonal shades and it´s perfect for Lomography especially when it´s outdated.
  • Polaroid Spectra In Expired Instant Film

    Polaroid Spectra In Expired Instant Film
    With its redesigned optics, flash, focus, and electronic systems, the Spectra blitz is the most attractive, easy-to-use large format Polaroid camera ever made. The wide-angle lens format captures 25% more information in a photo than a regular Spectra 1200 or Image camera, and 33% more than a 600 camera. A 3-Element Aspheric Lens System and Quench-Controlled flash provide sharper, better-exposed images.
  • Olympus OM2n – Smallest SLR In The 80's

    Olympus OM2n – Smallest SLR In The 80's
    This small SLR was the start into my photography „career“. It was given to me as a present by an old neighbor who just heard about my effort to start into b&w photography at school. He said he can`t hold it anymore and it`s better in my hands than dusty in his storage rack. It came with an Olympus flash, manual, a 35mm Zuiko lens, a 50mm Zuiko lens and a Tokina 70-150mm
  • Balda Baldessa 1b: I Think I Am In Love

    Balda Baldessa 1b: I Think I Am In Love
    When I was at school, and I was learning French, I never understood why the French language described inanimate objects as either masculine or feminine, similarly, in German. In the English language we just have things. It is a table. It is not feminine or masculine, transgender not even just going through a phase. It is simply a table nothing more. As I grew up and became more interested in my own language the thought of non gender specific objects disappointed me. I think for all the richness and complexity of the English language, for the times we were conquered and our language evolved; that we don’t feminise or masculinise objects is to our linguistic detriment. Of course the problem is that it is not the thing that is masculine or feminine, it is the prefix to the word itself in the construct of the language that denotes gender. So, in English a camera can never be referred to as male of female because the prefix “the” or “a” is with out gender and renders the object itself sexless. Or does it? My case and point to you is the Balda Baldessa