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Model Kit 135 Camera 28mm

It is a DIY camera from the far East, which you can get on the net at a low price. Of course assembly is required before use. Read on to learn more about the 135 Camera 28mm Model Kit.

On the internet, it is advertised as a “Do-It-Yourself-Holga” for 35mm film with a focal length of 28mm. Full of anticipation, I waited for about two weeks for the parcel to arrive from China. I stopped short once I opened it and took a look inside. Unlike the Holgas I used, the well-known logo was nowhere to be seen and I realized: this isn’t even a Holga! Crap, but what is it then?

At first sight of the kit, I could not imagine that the 33 parts in the box should be a usable camera. So I started to tinker and it was relatively fast: the building instructions are not bad at all.

Assembly was with done in less than an hour – fairly quick! With my experience through the Konstruktor. All part but 6 screws, 4 springs and the strap are made of plastic. This of course included the optics.

The camera has a 28mm lens and has thus a little wider angle than the LC-A, for example. The size of the fixed aperture is not specified, but is about f/8, such as the La Sardina. The fixed focus depicts relatively sharp photos for shots which are more than a meter away.

The interconnection of the film transport and shutter makes it impossible to take multiple exposures. The frame counter works surprisingly well and the lock of the camera body also makes a good impression. So, the danger that the cover on the back suddenly jumps off doesn’t exist. Another extra is the sliding lens cap to protect the “precise” optics, which locks the trigger when closed. Not bad, you won’t take any pictures of your jacket pockets. Unfortunately, there is no chance to use a flash.

In contrast to Lomography cameras, the camera seems rather inconspicuous, so that the little black dressed camera at the first test shots attracted less attention than other cameras I have on the shelf. For the first pictures, I took a ISO 200 film on a relatively sunny day. In direct comparison, I prefer to overexpose the film instead of under exposing it, the shutter speed is indeed also unknown, but may vary due to the design.

Due to the plastic lens the pictures aren’t that sharp, but I kind of like that. The camera is very special. Who likes the look of the images and dares to put the kit together will get a very special camera for very little money and in addition you can have fun building it. But when it comes to DIY camera kits, I’ll recommend the Lomography Konstruktor or the Lomography Konstruktor Super Kit anyone who is willing to invest just a little more cash and a whole lot of DIY and fun shooting experience.

written by dopa and translated by dopa

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The original version of this article is written in: Deutsch.