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Lomopedia: Konica C35 AF

A landmark camera that was introduced in 1977, the Konica C35 AF holds the distinction of being the world's first autofocus camera. Find out more about this iconic and beautiful compact camera in this installment of Lomopedia!

The Konica C35 AF was launched by the Japanese camera maker in 1977, and became iconic for being the world’s first mass-produced autofocus camera. It was equipped with the “Visitronic” AF system that was created and produced by Honeywell for 35mm cameras. It also had an automatic exposure system that sets the appropriate shutter speed.

Konica, which began as a drugstore named Konishi-ya Rokubei Ten that sold photographic products, was Japan’s oldest camera company until it ceased making cameras in 2006.

Technical Specifications:

  • Type: 35mm Autofocus & Auto exposure compact camera
  • Lens: Hexanon 38mm f/2.8, 4 elements in 3 groups
  • Shutter: Programmed Leaf shutter with 3 speeds – 1/60s, 1/125s & 1/250s
  • Exposure: Fully automatic – 25 – 400ASA
  • Meter: CdS
  • Sensitivity: EV 9 – EV 17 with 100 asa film
  • Viewfinder: Bright Line 0.41 Magnification
  • Indication: Underexposure warning light, Parallax Correction Mark, Focus measuring square
  • Flash: GN14 – Exposure determined by range measured by autofocus
  • Film Winding: Manual – Lever wind + rewind crank
  • Features: Lens cap obscures viewfinder to prevent errors!
  • Dimensions: 132×76×54mm
  • Weight: 375 grams

All information for this article were sourced from Konica C35 AF on Camerapedia and Konica C35 AF on Wikipedia.

written by plasticpopsicle

1 comment

  1. cornelius_rost

    cornelius_rost

    Nice article. :-)
    The AF from the camera works really perfect, in all situations. The lens is great.
    Happy shooting!!!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam

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