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Holga 135 BC, From Dream to Reality

A few months ago I got on the online store the Holga 135BC. I saw a lot of great photos taken with the Holga 120, but my favorite medium format is the Diana F +, I decided to invest in the 135 BC instead. Here is my test to celebrate the return of the sun.

A disconcerting camera:

The Holga 135 BC is a mini all-plastic camera. In the image of Diana, it is lightweight, easy to handle, but confusing in its toy camera appearance. This camera has a plastic lens mounted like the Holga 120, but in 47mm. It has the same features of two apertures F8 and F11 and a shutter speed of 1/100s. It has marked BC means “Black Corners”, this being due to vignetting it produces.

When the Holga 135BC is used for the first time, one wonders what it will provide. I think the toy appearance is for many, however, and as far as shooting, as with any camera, a relation to the object is established, and it becomes a friend.

A different lens for extraordinary rendering:

Indeed the plastic lens is not the same as the Diana F +, and suddenly rendering is really different. The Holga 135 BC produces pictures equally dreamy but under other visual aesthetics. When I look at the pictures, I realized ​​that with this camera I have the impression that a veil is dropped on. A haze, which could be likened to a white fader that is often seen in flashbacks in mainstream series. Obviously, there is nothing pejorative in it, on the contrary, this is the great force of aesthetics of the Holga.

Obviously, I worked almost exclusively in double exposure with this camera, and it is ready to play brilliantly. The rendering is nice but confusing in terms of framing. In fact, I advise you not to know so that you get to meet the depths of fields offered by this new friend.
And above all, it’s good to step back when you try to make a portrait, many of my photos had only half a face because it is not designed to take too closeup shots.

Finally, I realized upon testing with two negative films Lomography 400 ISO in bright sun, I recommend you the 100 or 200, by its speed to 1/100s and available openings, the Holga 135 BC is not that hungry for light.

written by jaybees80 and translated by jaybees80

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The original version of this article is written in: Français.