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KID: Grandaddy's Camera

A few months ago, a friend who knows about my love for analogue photography gave me as a gift one of those cameras I would have never bought for myself . However, I can say I'm truly surprised by the pictures it takes.

A few months ago, a friend brought me a surprise from a flea market she had been that weekend. It was a box camera. I had seen dozens of them in many flea markets and shops, but they had never drawn my attention, nor I had thought about buying one.

The seller mentioned that the camera, a KID, dated back to the 1930’s. I can neither confirm nor deny this data, since I have not found any available information.

It’s works mighty fine, it shoots and the shutters open. It has two speeds: normal and bulb mode. I don’t know what speed it shots, however, by the outcomes, I can say it’s an speed slow enough that my lack of steady hands shows in all the pictures… I don’t have a clue about its aperture and it’s biggest flaw is the dirty viewer, which makes framing quite difficult.

The simplicity of the camera makes it very easy to use. It takes 120 mm film, 6 × 9 format.

As I commented above, the dirtiness on the viewer makes framing quite difficult and makes you shot quite randomly. Trying to frame at a guess whatever you want to capture.

After the long talk, here are some pictures taken with this camera…

The first film I used with this camera was a Kodak 160 NC. I thought I would need as much light as I could get, in some pictures I used the bulb mode, however, stability was a challenge…

The second film I used was a Ilford HP5 Plus de ISO 400. A few pictures are a little blurry, maybe by my lack of a steady hands, or it might be the camera’s lenses. In any case I love the outcome!

Bellow, my favourite pictures with this camera:

written by yomimmo1 and translated by melcalero

4 comments

  1. diomaxwelle

    diomaxwelle

    My first box camera was a Brownie six-20 model d, and I had never used one. My dad brought it back on a cross-country trip w/ my sister who was moving to Florida--a consolation prize cuz I couldn't take work off until the summer. XD It works pretty well considering the age and the dirty glass, so I know what you mean.

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  2. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    The lenses on most of these things are mostly better than they look, the shutter speeds are usually about 1/25 when new. Everything should be in focus from 3 meters to infinity. Brace up on things when taking photo. Wonderful article and gallery!! When I was a child, at photo time, I was handed a really big, crackle painted, tin, OD color box camera called "Corona" and admonished not to shake and don't cut off heads and "feets" for family pictures. It was 1956 and I was 6 and that huge box took 125 roll film, making negatives 4 1/2" x 5 1/2" and and the prints were the same size. I don't know what became of the camera or the photos. The photos it took were very sharp. It belonged to my Grandmother and she died in 1958.

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  3. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    BTW... I think your camera might be a Goldstein "Kid Box", 1930ish, I was looking at pictures on Google, and it's the right shape.

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  4. yomimmo1

    yomimmo1

    Thanks @melcalero for translate it!!!
    Thanks @tomkiddo, @wuxiong, @sirio174, @clownshoes, @alex34, @vicker313, and @adi_totp for likes!!
    Thanks @diomaxwelle for your comment... yeah, i don't expect any thing when I shoot for first time, was a good surprise!!!
    @herbert-4 thanks a lot for the info! i also have seen the Goldstein "Kid Box", but I think it's a bite different... but maybe... Thanks again!!!!

    about 1 year ago · report as spam

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The original version of this article is written in: Spanish.