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Scotch Super Chrome 100 - Repeating History

The history of film production must be as confusing and incestuous as the web of royal relationships of the European kingdoms in the 17th century up to the 19th. Back in the days, a German noble becomes the Russian Czaress, French lords became kings of Spain, and even the Danish were ruling all of Scandinavia. A marriage here, a war elsewhere, a coup d'etat everywhere - such a mess. Nothing was like it seemed and you could never trust what you were told. And with the Scotch Super Chrome 100 it’s history repeating itself.

In the 1980’s and 1990’s, film production reached its height and every company that had kind of a chemical production wanted to have a share of the cake. So where did this brand Scotch came from? I read it is a sub-brand from 3M, an American cooperative from Minnesota, which does kind of everything. Among their biggest products is… Scotch. Like tape, like adhesive plaster, basically like scotch. And because Scotch is such a big name, 3M decided to use that name for film production as well. But on top I read, that this sub-brand went over to a company called Ferrania, which has some connections to the states, but is based in Italy. But there we are again with the royals, you never know what you really get.

So let’s talk about the Scotch Super Chrome 100. My first thought was that this film was refilled in Italy with some other emulsion of the big film companies. Like Lomography is filling some of their films in Italy. So what do we have here? I crossed this slide-film, as I do it with every expired slide-film. It is in a way reddish, magenta-ish and the grain is kind of unique. Not too strong, but visible.

I don’t think it’s AGFA material, it would be bluer, when you cross it. I also don’t think it would be Kodak Material, it would be greener or yellowish. I believe it must be something close to a Fuji Astia. Or it is truly an unique emulsion from 3M. In any way, I like it a lot. And I am happy, that something nice came out, because that is always a risk, too. And especially, because it was a lovely day in Almaty, Kasachstan, when I put this scotch into my LC Wide. And this scotch really stuck to his untold promise.

written by wil6ka

7 comments

  1. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    Excellent article!! With 3M, it really might have been their unique product!

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. istionojr

    istionojr

    great, thanks for the explanation info.

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  3. vicuna

    vicuna

    Thanks for all these great explanations Herr Willie! :)

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  4. marcus_loves_film

    marcus_loves_film

    Nice results from this Scotch Chrome! When did it expire? I have 2 brick of it from 1999 and the color and grain is way crazy. I shot my scotch 400 at 100 ISO for optimum results. What ISO did you use?

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  5. wil6ka

    wil6ka

    @herbert-4 yeah - they really had some chemistry action going on. In that case, I would even be more content about the results. @vicuna, @istionojr thnk you for reading amigos, @markus_loves_film I might have used 200...

    about 1 year ago · report as spam
  6. Benjamin Dietze

    Ferrania is/was an Italian manufacturer of photographic material, founded in 1923 and known especially for its Ferraniacolor after 1945, until it was bought by 3M in 1964 and became part of their Imation division in 1996. In the later years, they made and sold "Solaris" color negative film, and this ScotchChrome slide film. ScotchChrome was an own development of 3M for the E6 process, although pretty soon after introduction, they gave it away to their Italian Ferrania subsidiary which closed down its film production in 2009. Currently, the new company FILM Ferrania is in the process of re-starting all of Ferrania's business, having acquired its factory near Milan, Italy along with most of their technicians, and will bring ScotchChrome and Solaris to cine film and other formats, starting production in early 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrania http://www.filmferrania.it/ http://www.japancamerahunter.com/2013/08/film-news-ferrania-is-back-exclusive-interview/ https://www.facebook.com/filmferrania?ref=stream
    11 months ago · report as spam
  7. wil6ka

    wil6ka

    Everything stays fresh! :)

    11 months ago · report as spam

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Spanish & Deutsch.