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My Love for the Lomography Redscale 100 ISO - 120

I love shooting with the Lomography Redscale 100, a slightly cheaper alternative to my favourite Lomography Redscale XR. Keep reading to find out why!

My first experience with the Lomography Redscale 100 120 was less than desirable. Being a beginner, I was unaware of how I should use this particular film and this resulted to several rolls of underexposed negatives. The dark red tones dominated the photos and I wasn’t achieving the beautiful golden hues that other Lomographers were getting.

After studying the reviews online, I finally succeed and produced some decent red scale photographs.

The trick that I use to achieve these warm colours is by increasing the exposure by one stop. On the cameras that I can set the shutter speed (such as my Lubitel), I have the dial on 1/60s and on the cameras that have an ISO setting, I tend to have the dial set at ISO50. I love this film because it’s hard to go wrong when you overexpose the negatives. As you introduce more light, the intense red colour shifts to an orange/yellow tone and changes the look and feel of the image.

And what I’ve noticed with this particular film is that if you increase the exposure further, the colours change and adopts a greyish purple tinge. I adore the results! It’s very similar with the Lomography Redscale XR!

This film is available in both 120 and 35 mm format. I’ve only managed to get my hands on the 120 but I’m always on the lookout for the 35. I would love to play around with this film on my Lomography Sprocket Rocket.

Overall, I think the Lomography Redscale 100 should be in everyone’s film stash. It’s relatively cheap, hassle-free compared to homemade red scale (which I must try someday) and you can achieve some awesome outcomes without too much technique and work! It’s suitable for everyone including the novice and the gurus and it’s an excellent film for people who wants to shoot more and think less! The colour variation that you can achieve in a single roll of 120 is huge and is really worth a try!

written by amytam

4 comments

  1. neanderthalis

    neanderthalis

    Nice article, it took me a while to get adjusted to using this film too. I ruined several rolls of the 35 version before I found the tips on handling it better.

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  2. weaver

    weaver

    i can only use it in good light with my sprocket rocket, but it produces such lovely yellow/red shots!!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  3. amytam

    amytam

    thanks, @neanderthalis!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam
  4. amytam

    amytam

    @weaver, i still have trouble getting my hands on the 35mm version of this film! i do love thegolden hues that this film can produce!

    over 1 year ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Spanish, Português & Italiano.