Petzval_preorder_header_kit

Now Available for Pre-Order - First Come, First Served

Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

Lomography Lobster 110: A film that will take you back into the 50's and the Golden era!

Now, 110 format enthusiasts can enjoy that wonderful redscale effect most commonly seen in 35mm format. So whether you like red or orange tones in your photo, transforming your pictures into GOLD, or adore those rich retro sepia tones in your 110 image, the Redscale Lobster 110 film is your winner.

First of all, I love petite cameras because they are so cute and very easy to carry around. Second, I fell in love with redscale film because it can give your images more of that retro-feel or vintage look due to the rich sepia tone. Imagine my giddiness when I saw the new Lomography Redscale Lobster 110 film in the Lomography Shop News. I can finally combine that rich sepia tone and graininess of 110 film to make images similar to pictures taken during the 50’s! Better yet, I can shoot confidently on a sunny day and make gold-colored photos.

Photo by meatoyz1

Clearly, it seems harder to DIY redscale the color tiger 110 film because it’s in a cartridge and not in the same roll as 35mm film; so, kudos to Lomography for making redscale film available to the rising 110 format. Now, 110 format enthusiasts can enjoy that wonderful redscale effect most commonly seen in 35mm format. So whether you like red or orange tones in your photo, transforming your pictures into GOLD, or adore those rich retro sepia tones in your 110 image, the Redscale Lobster 110 film is your winner.

Photo by meatoyz1

My observation of the Lobster 110 film is that it gives different results depending on the sunlight available. Since most 110 cameras have fixed aperture, we cannot control the redscale result as much as we can compared to cameras that have adjustable ASA levels.

When it’s cloudy, the film produces sepia colors. Somehow, you can also get this result during a sunny day provided that the sunlight is not directly hitting the camera lens. The result is almost the same as setting your SLR/rangefinder/LCA ASA to 25-50.

The second redscale result I get is the reddish color. I usually get this result when the skies are cloudier. I did notice though that there is a bluish tint on shadows or in the dark side of the images when the result is a bit reddish.

Lastly, GOLD; freakin’ golden images. Sorry for using the golden era as a pun but you do get my point, Haha! When the sun is up and dancing solo in the sky, your redscale images will turn into gold. Usually this effect is amplified when the sunlight is directly hitting your camera lens. I love this redscale result because I have never seen so much yellow in my 35mm pictures. Notice that even the sprocket section is also golden.

Ultimately, these are just my observations with the Lobster 110 used with a cheapo but cute Holga Micro camera. There may be times that the redscale result will be very random, but I think that’s the most fun you will get with this film.

Also, the Lobster 110 film is rated 200 ISO so it will be able to handle sunny beaches and overcast afternoons. Happy Shooting!

written by meatoyz1

No comments yet, be the first