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Lomography Color Tiger 110 film: Put a Tiger in your Camera!

When I retrieved my first little camera, a Kodak pocket B-1, I was curious whether the required 110 film cassettes would still be available. Luckily Lomography had just introduced its new 110 films, the black & white Orca and the color Tiger films! I decided to put a Tiger in my camera first.

Photo by wesco

The Kodak pocket B-1 camera is a very simple 110 camera in the shape of a little black box, with a big blue shutter button, a wheel to advance the film and a slider on the back to change the film cassette. That’s all, so fixed focus, fixed aperture, fixed shutter speed! On top you can attach a bar with flashes, but I have not yet found those again.

The Color Tiger 110 film has an ISO value of 200, so it should be suitable for sunny or maybe a little cloudy days. Because of the small size of the negatives of 13 × 17 mm you cannot expect a lot of sharpness, especially not with a low end camera like the Kodak pocket B-1. So with limited expectations the little camera with the Tiger joined me in my daily life.

I handed in the full 110 cassette at my local Kruidvat drugstore, which has everything developed and printed at CeWe Color in Germany. That took more time than expected, but after an ample two weeks I could admire the results. The photos are printed in a slightly abnormal 10 × 12,7 cm format, sort of in between square and rectangular.

Unfortunately the negatives were not scanned and burned on CD like with 35 mm rolls, so I had to scan the photos myself. Who knows, maybe these photos have been printed in the old-fashioned analogue manner!

The results were about as expected, nothing spectacular, but certainly no disappointment. In sunny circumstances you get a good color representation with a little overexposure here and there, in slightly cloudy situations you get the most balanced exposure. When the light gets more dull, with more clouds, or late in the afternoon, the grain starts to become more visible and the colors get more pale and dim. A couple of photos from a very cloudy, early morning came out heavily underexposed and were not so good.

The limited sharpness is just acceptable for this size of prints, but this can also be caused by the simple lens in my little Kodak camera. Old photos from this camera which I retrieved were not very sharp either. Maybe more advanced 110 cameras like the Pentax Auto 110 can deliver sharper pictures.

In summary I am not disappointed about the results from the Color Tiger 110 film in my simple Kodak camera. With some attention for the right circumstances for a proper exposure you can make some nice pictures. However, also due to the lack of settings (no double exposures, fixed exposure) you don’t get ‘lomographic’ photos spontaneously. Maybe I should try the black & white Orca and the redscale Lobster 110 films also!

written by wesco and translated by wesco

3 comments

  1. percyowl

    percyowl

    Great article! I was wondering about the resolution on 110 film, whether it was just me because few articles mention it. I was thinking about buying another 110 camera but I haven't seen any 'amazing' photo from 110 cameras thus far except a Pentax Auto 110 - which I just acquired recently, so I better get snapping!

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  2. wesco

    wesco

    @percyowl: The results are always a combination of the camera, the film and the photographer. With a better lens like in the Pentax Auto 110 I expect sharper results, but due to the small size of the negatives it will probably never match 35 mm SLR quality. So you have to throw in your photographers skills to make the best of it. I am curious for the photo's from your new camera!

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  3. marjanbuning

    marjanbuning

    Leuk artikel heb sinds kort ook zo'n camera leuke toy camera

    almost 2 years ago · report as spam

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The original version of this article is written in: Nederlands. It is also available in: Deutsch.