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Canon Sure Shot: Sure was a Short Experience

A fully automatic compact with a 38mm f./2.8 lens, the Canon Sure Shot has one neat feature which can separate it from other similar compacts. It was good, while it lasted.

As I do most weeks, I visit the local charity shops when I am not in a lesson at school. I go there to pick up cameras and other things that interest me. On one particular occasion I went and sifted through the box, which was full of the usual stuff. I then picked up the Canon Sure Shot, which to be honest, could be classified as “the usual stuff.” But anyway, I noticed the lens was multi-coated and 38mm, 2.8, and could be interesting.

When I asked the woman, who I actually know quite well, how much she wanted for it, she just said “take it, but don’t tell anyone.”

So off back to school I went, free camera in pocket. I fiddled with it most of the day and when I got home, cleaned out the corrosion in the battery compartment and put in some fresh batteries.

The specs of the Canon Sure Shot are as follows:

  • 38mm 2.8 auto focus lens
  • built in flash
  • self-timer
  • The shutter only re-cocks after you have let go of the shutter release
  • ….and the function which I think sets it apart: focus lock.

The auto focus focuses on whatever is in the middle of the frame. You use the focus lock by pointing to the center at something you want to be in focus; Half-press the shutter, recompose, and then fully press the shutter. It is much quicker and easier in practice.

Anyway, I loaded the camera with my usual Lucky SHD 100 at it whirred into life (man, this camera is loud). I headed out just one a random walk to test the camera.

I was happily shooting away, I took my 8th frame and the camera didn’t wind on. Whatever I did, it didn’t respond and the camera was well and truly dead. So I had to bin the camera and salvage the film under my quilt. I then put the film into my Konica C35 of which I will be reviewing soon.

Here are the last 8 photos this camera took, in the 2 images, I used the focus lock:

As you can see the results are well okay; not as good as I was expecting, to be honest. They are sharp but the camera appears to produce a lot of grain on the film. I have never experienced this with Lucky before and this is like the only film I shoot and also in my Konica C35 review you will see results from the same roll and they aren’t grainy. I think the graininess is due to the IR beams the camera uses for the autowind.

All in all, it’s a pretty average camera, though has a few neat features. If you see one cheap, pick it up but I wouldn’t go out of my way to own one.

Thanks for reading, keep shooting!

written by brandkow93

5 comments

  1. droogieboy

    droogieboy

    Ha!Ha! I had exactly the same experience! I got obsessed with 80's compact cameras after brilliant results with my Olympus Trip, and wanted to see what other models from that era could do. I bought a 2nd hand Canon Sureshot cheaply off Ebay , but had my doubts immediately from the horrible WHIRRRRRR noise it made when taking a pic . It then stopped working and gave up for good less than 20 shots into a 36 exposure film . They should rename this camera the Canon Unsure Shot, because you'll never know if it will function properly

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. brandkow93

    brandkow93

    @droogieboy hahaaa That would be a more relevant name, and yes the noise is terrible, sounds like a chainsaw.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. megalithicmatt

    megalithicmatt

    Since the camera was on its last legs, it's possible that it didn't register the ISO of the film correctly and shot the roll at a faster speed than normal to cause the underexposed images. My (incredibly noisy) Ricoh R1 regularly misinterprets DX codes and produces very grainy photos on fresh 100 speed film.

    I'm assuming Lucky film canisters have DX coding (I haven't used any), but if they don't then the camera may have defaulted to another speed, or the developer may have been tired.

    I have to say though, I've got a Sure Shot 65 that works perfectly! All these 80s and 90s compacts are extremely cheap and easy to get hold of, so don't write off the model on one bad experience :)

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  4. brandkow93

    brandkow93

    @megalithicmatt you set the iso manually, it doesnt read dx coding. Not sure why the images lok the way they do to be honest

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  5. Jason Preza

    Yo i know this article is old but i have the same camera, brand new, so i was wondering what film should i use that would give me the best results. Oh and im new to this camera stuff...
    5 months ago · report as spam

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Português & 中文(繁體版).