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The Sprocket Rocket and La Sardina: Lessons Learned Using Lomography Lady Grey ISO 400

On an outing to Xi'An, China, it was my first time experimenting with the Lomography Lady Grey 35mm film. I had recently gotten a hold of a Sprocket Rocket and a friend Aminta had her La Sardina, so this was the perfect a chance to take a picture of ancient history, so it just had to be B&W. This is a review on the film working alongside the Sprocket Rocket and the La Sardina!

Walking around the back of the tombs.

Still an amateur at this analogue stuff. What with choosing film, colors, composition, randomness, weird shots, blah blah blah. But my most recent adventure was going to Xi’An, China (where the terracotta warriors are located) and armed with our cameras in hand and stocked with Lady Grey, we set out! After spending a day wandering around the different tombs and taking photos here and there i was really excited to see what we would get (I paid some good money to get into that museum)… BUT ALAS! all our photos indoors had failed. I have heard that the Sprocket Rocket was a little light hungry, and that the La Sardina had a decent aperture, and as the Lady Grey was an ISO 400 film, I was expecting some decent photos… but this woman is no pushover.

Here is some photos from the PNS (point and shoot) digicam we took along… you can see the lighting was pretty good, even though it was indoors.

And here is the shot from my Sprocket Rocket. I really didn’t think that the photos indoors would fail me so! I took about 5-6 shots with my Sprocket Rocket in the tombs. only this came out….

Photo by panda-man

And these are some shots from our La Sardina. The lower aperture allowed for…. a little more than blanks… you can see only the lighting from the windows and slight outlines of the warriors. But nothing else.

Basically, what I’ve learned is that for B&W and the Sprocket Rocket… (and La Sardina) well keep it outdoors. unless…. there is a lot… really a lot of light indoors. I think the La Sardina might be a little more forgiving. It was disappointing, but as long as I’m learning something. it was worth it. this was just a fun trip. cant imagine going to someones wedding and having rolls of blank shots hahah. I suppose the films ISO 400 rating is suitable only for super lit indoor areas or outside under sunlight. still a little confusing…

Here are some other photos from the trip, taken outdoors with the La Sardina and Sprocket Rocket! So nice.Ii think lady grey has become my favorite film!

Lomography’s Lady Grey is a lovely black and white 35mm ISO 400 film that will add class and elegance to your photos. For capturing action and great low-light shots, Lady Grey is your best bet. See our selection of Lomography films here.

written by panda-man

7 comments

  1. i5rovic

    i5rovic

    Just read the manual before you shoot :)

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. stratski

    stratski

    I know there's this whole "no digital manipulation" thing going on on this site, but you might be able to save quite some images in photoshop (or the GIMP, or even Windows Photo). You can make the image lighter, and increase the contrast. I tried this out with a few of these images, and got quite some detail back. You won't get the crisp, shorp pictures of the digicam, but at least you can see where you were.
    It's really no different than what you could do in a analogue darkroom, so why not? It's your memories, after all...

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  3. panda-man

    panda-man

    @i5rovic - .... ok... if it only was that easy.
    @stratski - thanks for the tip, but its alright. the negatives for those photos came out completely blank, so unfortunately theres nothing to fix even :P except that one photo i posted heh. i got some digital shots of the same photos so its alright.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  4. i5rovic

    i5rovic

    Switch your digital camera to manual and make photo with La Sardina adjustments (Aperture: f/8
    Shutter Speed: 1/100 (N)) and you will know what to expect. :)

    @stratski ... You are right about digital manipulation. After all there is Rule Number 10 › Don't worry about any rules.
    :)

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  5. panda-man

    panda-man

    @i5rovic - thanks for the tip! but dont really like to tweak with the digicam much hehe. just like to mess around with my lomo cams haha.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  6. simonh82

    simonh82

    Great article. The outside photos are really nice. Lighting indoors can be really tricky to judge. A space may feel well lit, but our eyes are excellent at adjusting to dimmer light, whilst film has a fixed ISO. Using the 'B' setting can be useful in these situations.

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  7. panda-man

    panda-man

    @simonh82 - Thanks for the tip. yeah. it really was pretty deceiving how much light was actually in the room, i didnt think about our eyes adjusting. heh. but anyways summer is here! gonna be outdoors to take all my photos hehe.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: 中文(繁體版) & ภาษาไทย.