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Kodak Gold: Expired 7 Years Ago

Here's a story of how I shot an expired Kodak Gold 100 film by mistake. Now that I've experienced this issue, I'll share it with all of you.

Anybody who had a film camera had most certainly used this film. You can find it at any drugstore, 1-hour lab, or shop. It’s still produced by Kodak and it’s best for outdoor shooting.

I came across this film in the counter by chance. At a 1-hour lab near my house, with every film developed you will get a free new roll of film. That film was a Kodak Gold 100. I think the catch was that the film was either expired or stored in bad condition. The film that I got was expired 7 years ago. The sky was clear, the sun wasn’t that bright (it was spring), and there was no fog in the air.

After developing the Kodak film, the results where astonishing. It had a lot of blue in the photos, soft and faded colors, but still I loved it. Still, I think it was expired due to the fact that I couldn’t create large prints, and because in some photos the details of the face, for instance, are fading pretty ugly. I got a couple of nicer shots from this film and I went home happy. I think a fresher roll of Kodak Gold will provide better results.

I don’t really know what exactly caused those results, where to buy same film, or any other details, but I think one will find some expired rolls on ebay.

If you come across this expired film, I wish you good luck at shooting with it!

You can read more about the film here!

written by pvalyk

6 comments

  1. emilios

    emilios

    great tones in ur pictures

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. hairil

    hairil

    Despite the film's age, your shots still came out pretty good! Great stuff!

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. chilledvondub

    chilledvondub

    i shoot a hell of a lot of expired film and develop it myself too! and i have had similar problems but i find in the development process if you increase the temperature of the Blix (Bleach+Fix) about 42°C as apposed to the guided 38°C and wash the film at room temperature 21°C rather than the guided 38°C and dry cut and scan before stabilising (depending on weather you want to maintain the negatives) i find it holds the colours within the emulsion on the film and restores the colours the film would usually obtain. On the otherhand if you have all your films developed at a lab you have no control over the photos at all. But you have some nice results and the film clearly survived all that time :)

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  4. pvalyk

    pvalyk

    @chilledvondub indeed, I develop my films at a lab and, indeed, I don't have any control over my photos, but I trust the lab-guy and it won't disappoint me.. thanks for the tips, maybe I'll do some lab work one day.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  5. chilledvondub

    chilledvondub

    @pvalyk it is a hel of a lot easier to run it down to your local lab ha, but i do recommend trying out developing your film its really rewarding when you get your first roll done :)

    over 2 years ago · report as spam
  6. pvalyk

    pvalyk

    @chilledvondub thanks for the tips, I promise i'll start developing. I'm loving the hole Caffenol-C idea and I think I'll start with it.

    over 2 years ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Italiano.