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Noir Photography with Ilford Delta Professional

Looking for a film you can use in low-light conditions? Let me show you how to shoot and hunt into the night with a camera loaded with Ilford Delta 3200 film.

As the Ilford team says Delta 3200 Pro is an ultra-speed black and white film, ideal for fast action and low light photography such as night time, sport, or indoor architectural applications where flash photography is not allowed to use. This is a genuine high speed film with an ability to record highlight detail that sets it apart from other films. ILFORD DELTA 3200 PROFESSIONAL has many strengths, most notably its liberating high speed, unobtrusive grain structure and its unsurpassed tonality.

Ok, so it’s the fastest film available on the market, perfect to be pushed or pulled for as far as you can think of (I say on a website a 3200 Delta Pro pushed at 12800 ISO!), can be used in darkest places, and so on. So I bought one, waited the night to come, and started hunting. It’s a film perfect to use in any environment, with any camera. I used an app for Iphone to get the proper exposure shutter speed and aperture, because my light meter won’t work. I shot the Delta Pro 3200 as 1600 ISO and got it developed as 3200 film.

The grain suites for me and in many pictures are unbelievably beautiful. As lomography team points out, Delta Pro 3200 is the perfect film for noir pictures.

Ilford Deltapro 3200 35mm is super-high-speed film allows for hand-held shooting in low light without a flash. It also features a fat film grain for that authentic old-school “noir” look. Check it out with the rest of our black and white film selection.

written by pvalyk

8 comments

  1. kkkk

    Why did you shot the Delta Pro 3200 as 1600 ISO and developed it as 3200 film. If you pulled film you usually develop it as you shot it, so in your case as 1600 ISO film. Is there any trick that I don't know?
    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. buckshot

    buckshot

    Delta 3200 Pro is great for rock concerts too, check here: http://www.lomograph(…)e-boileroom

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. zulkhairikharuddin

    zulkhairikharuddin

    what apps u use with iphone?

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  4. kkkk

    And I just found on this side: http://www.guidetofilmphotography.com/pushing-pulling-film.html that "It should also be noted that pulling 3200 speed film does not actually pull the film. Because 3200 film is a push film, pulling the film back to 800 or 1000 ISO is actually exposing the film at the ideally rated ISO speed."
    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  5. pvalyk

    pvalyk

    @kkkk I overexposed the film. Better?
    @zulkhairikharuddin Pocket Light Meter is the best. Measures in any conditions you want it to.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  6. zulkhairikharuddin

    zulkhairikharuddin

    @pvalyk thanks, i just installed it.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  7. Mari-Xouana H Flou

    Regarding kkk's original question, exposing the 3200 Delta at ISO 1600 is because Ilford's published developing times for this film (and only for this) are wrong (that's strange but true). That means if you expose at 3200 and develop for 3200 (according to Ilford's times), the negative turns out very thin (underexposed). So, for the correct exposure, you should either let more light reach the film (by exposing at 1600, we get slower shutter speeds = more light) or develop for more time (that's shooting the film at iso 3200 and developing (always according to Ilford's times), meaning pushing, at 6400). As for the "true" ISO of super fast films ( Ilford Delta 3200 and Kodak TMax P3200), well, for starter's, there's no such thing as "true" iso. It's all about technicalities describing density and contrast at given developers at given temperatures. Thing is, these films can be used at iso 1200 or 1600 or even 800. But they are designed to be pushed at iso 3200. That means at those lower speeds they have very low contrast and very smooth tonal transitions (a very nice greyscale), and only give normal contrast when pushed at iso 3200.
    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  8. shariff

    shariff

    awesome!!!! just what i need!!! ^_^

    11 months ago · report as spam

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