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Kodak T-Max P3200 (35mm, 3200 ISO)

Do you want the ultimate speed? Do you want to shoot without flashl? Do you love grain? If you answered yes to all questions, read on.

There are only a few high speed black and white films (Fuji Neopan 1600, Ilford Delta 3200, etc.). Kodak’s T-Max P3200 is an extension of their T-Max line (which also comes in 100 and 400 ISO). Technically, the film isn’t actually “rated” (the speed given on a film is the optimum speed as denoted by the producers) at 3200 ISO, but 800 ISO. The “P” means it can be “pushed” (exposed and developed as a faster speed film) up to 3200 ISO.

So, technically, T-Max P3200 is an 800 ISO film that can be developed at 800 to 3200 ISO at a 1:1 dilution of D-76 developer. Also, if you use it at the “stock” dilution, you can even get 400 or 6400 ISO out of it. So, T-Max P3200 clearly has a very wide development latitude. When I tested it out, I shot my roll as 1600 ISO and developed it in D-76 developer as such. Therefore, if you want to shoot at any speed between 800 or higher, P3200 is a great choice. Any lab that would develop black and white can develop it at any ISO between 800 – 3200 you shoot it at, just make sure to write something like “@ 1600” on the roll where it says “Notes” and remind them when you drop it off.

I shot my test roll mostly outside, moments before dusk or moments after sunrise with no direct sunlight at 1600 ISO. I also took photos without any flash in my Kodak Retina IIc, using a shutter speed of 1/60th of a second and f/5.6, f/4, or f/2.8. I don’t recommend shooting with this film indoors in a toy camera without a flash unless it’s very bright and you’re shooting it as 3200, but it would probably be an awesome experiment. It would probably be an awesome companion for your LC-A+, LC-Wide, or Horizon Perfekt in “night mode.” Like any faster film, there’s plenty of grain at any ISO you shoot it at, but it’s certainly not excessive. I really like it at 1600 ISO, but feel free to experiment. In fact, I really hope you do!

Note: All of the haze on the photos is from improper development. I didn’t close the development tank properly and even that tiny bit of light messed with my photos. If your tank is plastic and comes with a cylindrical insert, make sure to put it in the hole in the film reel where it belongs. If you don’t, you’ll get pictures like these.

written by nation_of_pomation

5 comments

  1. neurodiaz

    neurodiaz

    Nice review!! :) blessings from Venezuela

    about 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. istionojr

    istionojr

    really deep review, awesome! lucky I've got one in my fridge.

    about 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. nation_of_pomation

    nation_of_pomation

    Thank you both!

    about 3 years ago · report as spam
  4. bongo_biene

    bongo_biene

    What developing time did you use for 1600 and 3200
    and what rythm of rotation

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam
  5. nation_of_pomation

    nation_of_pomation

    I used the Massive Development Chart times fro D-76.

    almost 3 years ago · report as spam