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Review: Lomography Colour Negative 100

Not exactly the most versatile of films, but works like a charm when it does.

They arrive in the same black box of my LC-Wide – with the most adorable of cans I’ve ever seen to house them. It is a great decision from LSI to include 2 rolls of film for the user to start straight away, and I gladly used them as my first 2 rolls to try out the new camera.

The thing about ISO 100 films is that you sometimes worry if there is enough light to shoot in. If you’ve been shooting digital for quite some time before, you would know from experience that in certain lighting situations when to crank the ISO up to 200 or even 400; but right now I only had a 100 film and I can’t change that. That’s why films like the Ultramax 400 is popular as they can perform almost anytime before the sun sets.

Nevertheless, it is still great fun trying out long exposures and looking for places to rest the camera on – it gives opportunity to escape from the usual vantage point or eye level.

In bright sunlight, this film produced expectedly good images – colours are not exactly punchy but are natural enough; grains are not noticeable at a quick glance. Highlights and shadows are nicely balanced with not much contrast; basically almost can fool someone by saying it is shot from a digital camera. The same goes for images under a shade during daytime.

But what I love most are the results from indoor shots. If you can get your camera to be still during the slower shutter speeds, the film’s colour intensifies a bit, making the whole image a little richer. Night shots are great too, as the fine grains helped preventing the whole image becoming coarse.

Overall, this is a great traveling film if you are always on the street or outdoors. I’ve seen one of my friend’s photos from his trip to China using this film with his LC-A+ – he shoots almost exclusively under bright sunlight – and they are mind-blowing! But if you tend to shift between indoors and outdoors, it is better to get a 200 or 400 film. Or else, just try to keep your hands really steady!

Who says film is dead? Lomography’s got its very own emulsions to keep the fire burning! Visit the "Shop:http://shop.lomography.com/films/lomography-film and see which Lomography film is right for you.

written by shuttersentinel17

1 comment

  1. tomkiddo

    tomkiddo

    just bought a pack of these :) can't wait to try it out!

    about 3 years ago · report as spam