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Lomography Color Negative (400asa,120)

Magic happens when you match an old camera with a new film.

The first camera I owned that uses 120 format film is actually my grandpa’s old Seagull 203. I discovered it back in my hometown at his house, folded nicely in a drawer. It is probably close to 40-50 years old, and haven’t been used for maybe 10-20 years.

Anyway, the shutter wasn’t working, so I sent them to be repaired. I was really eager to try out this classic and my uncle recommended me to use Lucky and Shanghai B&W films as a started because they’re pretty cheap. The results are really nice and sharp, and it made me even wanted to see results using a colour film.

So I began searching for a Colour Negative 120 for it, also to be used on a trip to Krabi, Thailand. And nothing is better than starting with some Lomo films. I wanted to shoot deep into the evening, so I went for the Lomography Colour Negative 400 120 film.

After I loaded a roll into the Seagull, I realized that my camera has a maximum shutter speed of only 1/300 seconds. That means if I’m shooting outdoors in bright sunlight (which is the condition most of the time during the trip), I couldn’t use the Sunny 16 rule without cranking up the aperture to 32. Hence, for most of the shots outdoors, I’m shooting using 1/300sec, f.32 and ISO400.

When I got back my photos from the lab, I was stunned. I wasn’t expecting the colours to be so vivid, and because I was using a small aperture, the sharpness throughout was incredible. The amount of grain on the film is just nice as well. I posted my photos on facebook but some of my friends thought that it was from my DSLR!

After the trip I still have one more roll left, so I brought it back to my hometown to take a few more shots. This time I tried a couple of indoor shots, but because I’ve already knew how the images are going to turn out, it didn’t present me with as much anticipation.. But as expected, it still produced the same high quality photos and maintained it’s great colours.

Overall verdict: What more could I say? I was blown away. Everything about this film works, and I might have just found the perfect match for my grandfather’s old camera. Definitely going to use again in the future!

written by shuttersentinel17

5 comments

  1. wuxiong

    wuxiong

    Facinating results........ <:)

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. fad

    fad

    wah, sekarang saya x sabar tuk beli TLR Camera... gambar sharp.. nice... X)

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. ibkc

    ibkc

    Agreed 100%, I have been shooting this film in a Rolleicord V (which was made way back in 1955 and has some of the best lenses made in the 20the century for its democgraphic range, only the Rolleiflexes available at the time, which were for pros rather than amateurs, were better) and the results are just stunning. Super saturation and grain, amazing detail. You'd never know you were looking at photos from an antiqute camera and in fact, IMO, you could fool someone into thinking some of these came from a recent high-end camera. Just my .2, great review.

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  4. anyasf

    anyasf

    i like ur awesome pics :) r u indonesian?

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  5. shuttersentinel17

    shuttersentinel17

    Hi anyasf, thanks! No I'm from Malaysia :)

    over 3 years ago · report as spam

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This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Deutsch & 中文(繁體版).