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Lomo LC-A+RL: For those that like to color

Do you remember when you got your first coloring books or fingerpaint set as a child? Weren't you excited to create a crazy fantasy world with all those fun colors? Draw and doodle to your hearts content? Maybe even make handprints on your wall (provided you had understanding parents!)

As we get older, our childlike views on the world seem to fade with the passage of time. Homework, after school jobs and social activities begin to take the place of the unadulterated creative exploration we enjoyed in our childhood. And all too soon, we might even forget how to draw a simple stick person!

Ever heard the phrase, “Don’t color outside the lines?” I certainly did, and as a child it made NO SENSE! If I wanted to draw a purple cow, why not draw a purple cow? Were the crayon police going to come after me?

In photography, there have always been rigid rules regarding composition, exposure, film speed, equipment, etc etc. The list goes on and on. If your photo wasn’t perfect, you didn’t get accepted for that contest, win that prize, or receive that accolade, or whatever. I want to know, who makes these rules anyway? Don’t we all have to start somewhere and learn, just as a child learns to walk and talk? It can start to feel like some kind of elite club that only special people can be a part of. It can really drag a person down, and week after week when I go grocery shopping, I stop to peruse the photo magazines touting the latest in digital equipment. I am left with the feeling that it’s always about the megapixels, or the sensor, or the LCD screen and the staggering cost of accumulating such equipment. Where is the ART? Where is the creativity? Where is the sheer beauty of analogue?

Enter the LOMO LC-A+RL. I first started with a Russian LC-A about a year ago to get the hang of this lomography thing, then after shooting a few rolls I decided to preserve my Russian beauty, and I also wanted the full features that the LC-A+ offered. And no way could I do without my Russian lens! It’s like I have discovered how to color again, and fingerpaint forever!

I am so glad I invested in this camera. It has really saved me from a life of drudgery. I know that sounds strange to some, but it’s true! I love shooting with it. So light, easy to operate and everywhere I go, it is an instant conversation starter! I’m always reading about new tips and tricks to try with it that you just can’t do with a regular automatic point and shoot. I am simply amazed at the creativity of some of the photographs I see taken with this camera. Any color in the spectrum you want, you just pick a film and off you go!

One thing I still forget to do sometimes and that is to set the distance. But even when I do the pictures always manage to come out ok somehow!

I sometimes wonder what Ansel Adams would think about the Lomo LC-A+. He might laugh it off and go back to his large format work. Or he might just say, “Just feel the moment and go for it.”

I’d like to think he would be okay with us coloring outside the lines. So let’s all be kids again, grab our LC-A’s…stop worrying about those rules, and just SHOOT!

written by sthomas68

7 comments

  1. lighttomysoul

    lighttomysoul

    yes, my friend. That's exactly what I also find myself explaining to people when I mention I've gone back to using film.
    Because it's more fun, because you have to think, because you have to have an open mind and be able to expect anything and everything! You're not in control but you are. And sometimes you don't have to think at all. And because you're ACTUALLY TAKING REAL PHOTOGRAPHS. There's no digital monster to do it all for you, and then some. Just because you have a fancy camera, doesn't mean you're a photographer. A true photographer, or lomographer, to me, is someone that can convey a whole array of feelings, senses, words, thoughts, ideas through a single picture. Where the picture actually says more than a thousand words can. 15 billion megapixels doesn't mean you'll take great photographs.

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. sikucai

    sikucai

    during my time with DSLR, i always do care about the colors, not-to-out-of-focus pictures and megapixel...usually i will take the same scene more than 2 times to get the best result of snapping the picture...but since i move on to lomography, its all easy now! dont thik just SHOOT the moment that u think is meaningful to you!
    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. nadinadu

    nadinadu

    love the shot of the eiffel tower!! great article! :)

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  4. richidearthworm

    richidearthworm

    clap clap clap grate article :)

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  5. lakandula

    lakandula

    Great article! A very interesting read with awesome lomographs. Thanks for sharing.

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  6. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    Wonderful article!! I have, and have used for years, a Russian LC-A. I've handled a LC-A+, and the Russian thing seems much better made.

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  7. jacob-siau

    Leave the digital grind behind!!!

    about 3 years ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

This is the original article written in: English. It is also available in: Nederlands & 日本語.