Lca_120_september_2014_header
Have an account? Login | New to Lomography? Register | Lab | Current Site:

How to Get the Most Out of Your Redscales?

After shooting my first 3 rolls of redscale, it seem to have been quite successful. In my most popular photos, often the redscales, one of them won the competition for the Primavera Sound. I liked the results each time the best. So I want to tell you my impressions and experiences with this film, hits and errors, successes and failures, good photos and bad photos. All gentlemen ... go ahead and see.

Learn to love it.

First things first, a Redscale is not just a film inside out. Though it is easier to just buy Lomography Redscale, you can actually make your own redscale. Anyway, here is a tutorial to make your own redscale at home.

The film’s ISO is 100. This implies that we need much light, but when I say lots, I mean lots of light. The redscale has so much contrast and any shade or color becomes dark, very dark brown or black when developed. So be it on bright sunny days. Light colors will cover a range from an unpredictable yellow to orange. The palette appear quite pure, being that the color is accurately represented in your results. I would have to say that my first film had the best results because the colors were much more realistic than in the second and third roll.

Should we start talking about my mistakes?

1. It takes a lot of light.

When it is a sunny day, I can take pictures in the shade. But do not laugh … Sometimes we take a chance with the light and hoped it was enough. Well no, it was not. The results speak for themselves.

2. The matter of distance

Do not talk about focus, but allow the light to enter into the camera. If you want to use the flash, make sure you’re near your object.

Should we continue with my failures?

Errors when trying something can be fun and have unexpected success. You never know what will happen so it should fail from time to time, because it’s inevitable!

1. Use long exposures to achieve more realistic colors.

I do not know why I insisted that the long exposures would be more realistic colors, all I can assure you is that the results are amazing. In the first picture is a long exposure camera support on stage around 7 pm and I achieved my goal. In the second, I took the shot in the swimming pool in a hammock supporting it and everything turned blue. At least the sky is usually yellowish white light became the object became yellow sky.

2. Try using the red colorsplash.

In general I tried putting multiple colors, but barely able to distinguish the results of a white flash, blue or green. I can only tell you that red flash makes the background red, and yellow enhances the effect of redscales.

I’ve also had some success to tell you

1, Take the contrast of the film with strong back lighting, the effects are very powerful.

2. Shoot wide shots and use the sky’s contrast with the figures to get the best redscales.

3. Personalities in the dark. If it is night, approach your target and shoot it with the flash

But ultimately, when you load your camera, use redscale because it is an experience that you will not forget.

written by alehopgm and translated by mightymouse

8 comments

  1. disasterarea

    disasterarea

    nice guide

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. alehopgm

    alehopgm

    A couple of galleries are broken, could somebody of Lomography fix it?

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. alehopgm

    alehopgm

    Thanks @disasterarea!!!

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  4. fookshit

    fookshit

    fixed the galleries. sorry about that.

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  5. the_detourist

    the_detourist

    #1 guide to redscale: shoot 2 - 4 stops OVER what the rating of the film is. remember youre going backwards through the emulsion layers so to get back to blue you have to really "over expose". shooting a 100iso redscale with your camera set to 100 will lead to dark, underexposed shots.

    Try taking a 400 or 800 film and making it redscale then shooting it as 100 speed. Youll love it.

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  6. peropero

    peropero

    the only thing i dont like about lomography`s redscales films is that sometimes they are full of blue stripes and white stains. :(

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  7. pikc

    pikc

    Nice tone!

    over 3 years ago · report as spam
  8. glenn

    EXCELLENT

    over 2 years ago · report as spam

Read this article in another language

The original version of this article is written in: Spanish.