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Diana+ Splitzer Review: Mixing it Up

My latest Lomo addition came this Christmas in the form of a Splitzer for my Diana F+. The timing was perfect, as New Years was around the corner and I had several packs of Instax to use.

Photo by zakguy

I’ve been shooting with a Diana for over 3 years now and had always been enamored with shots on the site that used the incredibly simple, yet effective Diana+ Splitzer. I’d put off buying one in favor of bigger accessories and new cameras until I was recently given one for Christmas. I was very excited to start shooting with it and conveniently enough, New Year’s Eve was around the corner and I’d just gotten several packs of Fuji Instax for my Instant Back, so I had to combine the two accessories to see what the results were. My friends and I had a ton of fun experimenting with this over the course of a few nights.

The Splitzer concept is simple. It essentially acts as a partial lens cap, completely covering a minimum of half your lens at a time. This allows you to expose half of a frame at a time (or less depending on how you set the Splitzer, but we’ll get to that in a minute), which then lets you double expose a frame with two separate images that blend together into one You even attach it the same way you would a lens cap, it simply slips right onto the front of your lens barrel and then you adjust it accordingly to split the photo as you see fit. You might think, “Wait a minute, couldn’t I just cut a piece out of a lens cap and get the same effect?”, but you’d be wrong. What sets the Splitzer apart from the economic alternative is a combination of greater control of how evenly split a frame is and an additional piece that lets you split down to essentially 1/8th of a frame per exposure.

So once you’ve affixed your Splitzer, you’ll notice there are notches around the outer edge on the front. These let you slide the Splitzer to specific points, which lets you determine exactly when you’ve twisted your Splitzer 1/4 of a rotation, 1/2 of a rotation, etc. Using these, you can ensure that you’re exposing frames exactly as you’d like, whether it is halves, fourths or more. A second notch on the outside controls the secondary, blue colored shade. This cuts the frame down further from half if you want to expose an even smaller portion of the frame for crazy combinations of several exposures, allowing you to mix multiple people, places, colors, etc. There are few limits on what you can splice together.

My only experience so far is with the Diana Instant Back+ attached, but I’m looking forward to having even more space to play with using 120 film. Some things to keep in mind when shooting with a Splitzer:

1. If you want perfectly even halves of two objects/people/etc, make sure you’re the same distance from each subject so they’re to the same scale.
2. Be sure to at least double expose every frame unless you’re intentionally trying to have half the photo look like you had the lens cap on.
3. When shooting using instant film and a Splitzer, you have less room to work with and I noticed the left side of the photo tends to have more room than the left. Alternatively, splitting horizontally down the middle will come out more even, but you’ll be shooting rather thin slices that are very wide, so adjust accordingly.

Overall, I love my Splitzer and I’m excited to try new techniques to create fun, beautiful lomographs for my home.

written by zakguy

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